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Re: [aroid-l] OT -- Cleopatra's Earrings' botanical name, anyone?


You got it. That's exactly what I have. Your right, you can't have just one.
One interesting thing though was the bloom on this plant. The bloom spike
was about 3 feet covered with small white flowers. Actually, they didn't
look like much but they smelled wonderful. Very unexpected. Unfortunately I
have known the name but can't locate it. Thanks for the help anyway.

Harry Witmore
Cloud Jungle Art
www.witmore.net <http://www.witmore.net>





-----Original Message-----
From: aroid-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
[mailto:aroid-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu]On Behalf Of Planter Rik
Sent: Wednesday, October 16, 2002 2:51 PM
To: aroid-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: [aroid-l] OT -- Cleopatra's Earrings' botanical name, anyone?


Some 25 years ago, I bought a Cleopatra's Earrings plant.  It was like a
bright green little agave (though clearly not an agave).  Then it grew,
spreading its leaves evenly up an eventually flopping, unmanageable stalk.
Some time in between, when it was maybe a foot tall, it started sending out
opposite pairs of stolons, ultimately tipped with little 'uns, like a
Chlorophytum comosum/spider plant/airplane plant.  Since the leaves were
offset (I mean not directly over each other), the next set of opposite
earings followed before long, forming another arc.  I found it hard to keep
up with or to find an attractive way to present it.  I don't know what
ultimately happened to it.

Sorry, Harry, but the worldwide web doesn't seem to know what we're talking
about (assuming that your Cleopatra's Earrings are the same as mine was).

Nancy -- What beautiful blooms on the Princess's Earring tree!  I wish I had
had the Princess's rather than Cleopatra's.  Do you know anything about
availability of this tree or its cold hardiness?

Rik

-----------------------

< Not sure if this is the same as 'Princess's Earring' but this is
Dichrostachys cinerea.
Regards,
Nancy >

------------------------

< I know that this is not an aroid but if anyone knows the the proper name
for a plant called Cleopatra's Earring, I would be grateful.
Harry Witmore >

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