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RE: Berms, now top soil

And why the peat bogs are disappearing, too!

I think the depth of topsoil varies by spot - where I used to live up in
western Massachusetts in the Connecticut River valley, the topsoil in some
places has been deposited by eons of spring floods, and can be incredibly
deep.   Down here in north central Maryland, we share the lovely red clay
that you can't get a pick through... 

I'm sure you're right about enhanced subsoil being sold as topsoil.  Pity is
it's still better than what the developers leave. I've heard that's where a
lot of topsoil comes from - the developers scrape the land they are
developing and sell off the soil.

Maryland zone 6

-----Original Message-----
From: Island Jim
To: gardenchat@hort.net
Sent: 4/9/2003 5:45 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] Berms, now top soil

this is an interesting topic. just the mathematics of it are, i think. 
would seem to me that top soil is just that, the top 12 or so inches
are normally penetrated by the roots of grasses and broadleaf weeds. now
have no idea how large an area it would take to furnish all the top soil

that is sold in a single day in this country, but i suspect it would 
probably be an area at least the size of deleware. so i conclude that
many outfits are selling subsoil as top soil.

At 10:01 AM 4/9/03 -0400, you wrote:
>I always order "screened" topsoil. Costs a bit more but has no rocks,
>or beer cans . It is important to get it from a reputable place too. Go
>there and see it and smell it. Ask if it is enriched and if so with
>You don't want it enriched with sewerage sludge which usually has an
>Dan in PA
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