hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: Lots of questions...need help re lilies & peoniesespecially...

  • To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
  • Subject: Re: [CHAT] Lots of questions...need help re lilies & peoniesespecially...
  • From: "Marge Talt" <mtalt@hort.net>
  • Date: Mon, 5 Apr 2004 23:28:23 -0400

> From: Cersgarden@aol.com
> Marge, they come to us bare root and usually about the first that
we plant.
----------

Well, Ceres, your supplier must be handling them right if your
customers are having success with them.  I was repeating what has
been said on peony list.  Of course, being peony nuts, all the people
on that list *only* want to handle the plants strictly according to
Hoyle.  But, as someone said on this thread, if you have to move
them, they are tough and will probably survive; just may not bloom.

I've had 5 peonies for well over 20 years but have never dug them up
nor divided them...well, hardly ever done anything to them but cut
them back in fall and dispose of the foliage.  If they are really
lucky, they get a topdressing of compost every few years:-)  Love
them and only wish I had more spots where they'd get sufficient sun
to bloom.  

Of course, our crazy weather is guaranteed to do 2 things when
peonies start to bloom.  1) have a huge thunderstorm with high winds
and torrential downpours and 2) turn hottern' the hinges of
Hades...neither really good for optimum bloom.  But, when the gods
smile, there's nothing can beat a peony flower.  All of you north of
me should be able to have magnificent peonies in the full range of
bloom time.  We need to stick to the early types here for best
success.  

As long as I've had these plants, they've all bloomed together,
although some are supposed to be early and some mid-season.  Well,
last season, being about the coolest spring in memory, they actually
staggered their bloom with the 'earlies' coming on early and the
others following on a couple of weeks later.  I was amazed:-)

Marge Talt, zone 7 Maryland
mtalt@hort.net
Editor:  Gardening in Shade
-----------------------------------------------
Current Article: Battling Bambi
http://www.suite101.com/welcome.cfm/shade_gardening
------------------------------------------------
Complete Index of Articles by Category and Date
http://mtalt.hort.net/article-index.html
------------------------------------------------
All Suite101.com garden topics :
http://www.suite101.com/topics.cfm/635

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Support hort.net -- join the hort.net fund drive!
http://www.hort.net/funds/



Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index



 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement