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Re: Daffodil question


Thank you, Kitty.  I have always wondered where the name Mrs. R. O.
Backhouse came from - you have to admit it's an unusual plant name -
actually think I have a daff by that name; not very pink, but more
pink than yellow:-)

Marge Talt, zone 7 Maryland
mtalt@hort.net
Editor:  Gardening in Shade
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----------
> From: Kitty <kmrsy@comcast.net>
> 
> Auralie,
> I wondered too when I saw the name Backhouse.  I just planted
Lilium 'Mrs.
> R.O.Backhouse' last fall.
> 
> "England's legendary narcissus breeder Mrs. R(obert) O(rmston)
Backhouse
> (i.e., Sarah Elizabeth Backhouse, 1857-1921) developed the very
first pink
> daffodil."
> 
> M J-B's book:
> An early dream was the idea of an orange trumpet daffodil. 
Transforming the
> dream into reality took well over 100 years.  Trained geneticist
W.O.
> Backhouse, the son of famous daffodil breeding parents who had
themselves
> been trying for the same goal, started work.  His parent's had only
managed
> 3/4 length flowers such as 'Backhouse's Giant'...."
> 
> I don't know who developed your N. 'Mrs. R.O.Backhouse', whether it
was
> herself or her son.
> 
> Kitty
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: <Aplfgcnys@aol.com>
> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> Sent: Monday, April 12, 2004 9:08 PM
> Subject: Re: [CHAT] Daffodil question
> 
> 
> > In a message dated 04/12/2004 6:30:34 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
> > kmrsy@comcast.net writes:
> >
> > > Wm Backhouse of county
> > > Durham raised daffodils from 1856 yielding cultivars 'Emperor,
> 'Empress',
> > > 'Weardale Perfection', and 'W.P.Milner', and "the first two can
still be
> > > found growing in parks and gardens today, and looking well."
> > >
> > >
> >
> > Would this Backhouse have produced the old 'Mrs. R. O. Backhouse'
that is
> > still one of my favorite pinks?
> >
> >
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