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Re: watershoots/suckers?


Thanks, Jim.  I just never saw any lilac do it this thickly. I'm sure it's
not a graft, but it's hard to find info on it because it was named for
Father Fiala.  Google it and you get all sorts of info on his work with
lilacs, but not about this one named for him. We have it listed as a Syringa
patula cultivar, which is what it looks like, but the only Fr. Fiala Lilac
I've found on the internet is a vulgaris cultivar, and this doesn't look
like any vulgaris I've seen.  Well, unless I learn anything more, I'll see
what I can do to salvage some of these suckers.

Kitty
neIN, Z5
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "james singer" <islandjim1@verizon.net>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Saturday, April 09, 2005 6:34 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] watershoots/suckers?


> Don't see where you say the lilac is grafted [did I miss it?}, so what
> you see is what you get from the suckers.
>
> I've always heard "watersprouts" to refer to aggressive leaders
> originating above the graft. My valencia orange does that on
> occasion--sends out a leader from above the graft that seems to grow a
> foot a day until I lop it out.
>
> But if your question is why a lilac suckers [they all do, terribly],
> it's because that's what they do. I don't think stress has anything to
> do with it. Crape myrtle is the same way.
>
> On Apr 9, 2005, at 7:40 PM, Chapel Ridge Wal Mart National Hearing
> Center wrote:
>
> > I've seen crabapple trees with suckers shooting straight up all around
> > and I
> > know that's something they are prone to and that they should be
> > removed.  I
> > think they are called watersprouts?  Anyway, several years back someone
> > stuck a Fr. Fiala Lilac in the shady terrace garden at our display
> > gardens.
> > Eventually they figured out it didn't belong there and moved it over
> > to a
> > bed that eventually came into the possession of my nursery group.  I
> > need
> > more room for growing plants for resale and want to move the Lilac, two
> > viburnums, and a Lavatera  out of this bed that mostly consists of
> > Hydrangeas and a few Korean Rhodies.  Besides, they shouldn't be in
> > shade............which brings me back to the Lilac.  This full sized
> > specimen (about 5 ft, small leaved - I'm unsure of species, but a
> > dwarf of
> > some kind)  has what appears to be a couple hundred watershoots, about
> > 8
> > inches tall, at its base.  I've seen suckers from Syringa vulgaris,
> > but not
> > like this.  It looks like a plant's response to stress  - could that
> > stress
> > be the result of moving too often or trying to survive in shade?
> >
> > My main question is whether these shoots might be worth propagating.
> > Of
> > course, I won't really know what's there until we dig it up.  If they
> > can be
> > removed with some roots, I'd like to give it a try.  If they aren't
> > salvageable, they still should be removed, right?  Any ideas as to
> > whether
> > this effort might be worthwhile?
> >
> > Kitty
> >
> > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> > To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the
> > message text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT
> >
> >
> Island Jim
> Southwest Florida
> 27.0 N, 82.4 W
> Hardiness Zone 10
> Heat Zone 10
> Minimum 30 F [-1 C]
> Maximum 100 F [38 C]
>
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