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Re: Gourds


It amazes me how many "non-gardeners" don't know where a luffa "sponge"
comes from. They hear "sponge" and think the ocean. There is nothing
better than a soft, home-grown luffa sponge. Those you buy in the store
are so stiff they would tear my skin off...but if you pick them small
(cucumber size) and let them dry...they are so awesome!!!!



ger <islandjim1@verizon.net> wrote:
Thanks, Jesse. I'm building a consensus here and it says [so far] I 
need to let them climb and dry on the vine, like luffas, which reminds 
me that I found a luffa seedling when I was cleaning out a bed today to 
plant one of the Solanum vines. So I gave it a string up to the 
lathhouse--it's been four years since I've grown luffas and I'm down to 
two unused ones; time to re-stock.


On Apr 12, 2005, at 6:45 PM, Jesse Bell wrote:

> Hi Island Jim...if nobody has answered this for you (yet) here is what 
> I
> know. I grow them almost every year (birdhouse gourds, dipper gourds,
> Luffa, etc.) and they want to climb. They don't HAVE to but it is what
> they normally do. The gourds are soft at first and if they are on the
> ground they will tend to rot on the vine from moisture in the ground. I
> have had them climb on a trellis, a tree and a fence. Any of them work.
> They do not like a lot of moisture because they can get mold/mildew
> (like cucumbers and such). Hope that helps! Oh..and if you want to use
> the mature gourds for something, just let them dry on the vine or pick
> them when they are the size you want and let them sit until the next
> year, someplace dry. And no matter how dry it is...most of them will be
> covered with black spots of mold all over them. This is normal for the
> drying process. When they are hardened and you can hear the seeds 
> rattle
> in them, take them and scrub them down with a bleach/water
>
> solution and scrub them with one of those "Chore Boy" sponges. 
> Usually gets most of that black mildew stuff off of them.
>
> Jess
>
> james singer wrote:
> I've got a seedling bottle gourd growing in a 1-gallon pot in the
> lathhouse; it is just beginning to produce secondary leaves. And I need
> advice. I want to plant it somewhere so it will produce a bottle or
> three, but I have no idea what it wants, including whether it needs to
> go in the ground or can stay in a large pot [say, 15 gallon]. I know it
> may run all over hell's halfacre no matter where it's planted, but
> that's okay--I've got the room. But does it want/need to climb?
>
> Island Jim
> Southwest Florida
> 27.0 N, 82.4 W
> Hardiness Zone 10
> Heat Zone 10
> Minimum 30 F [-1 C]
> Maximum 100 F [38 C]
>
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>
Island Jim
Southwest Florida
27.0 N, 82.4 W
Hardiness Zone 10
Heat Zone 10
Minimum 30 F [-1 C]
Maximum 100 F [38 C]

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