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Re: Kudzu invasion!


Well I would hope not! I don't want to lose my whole kudzu collection!

On Apr 28, 2005, at 6:06 PM, Chapel Ridge Wal Mart National Hearing Center wrote:

Otherwise I wouldn't think the gov could just come on your land and
spray whatever you have growing.
Kitty
----- Original Message -----
From: "Zemuly Sanders" <zsanders@midsouth.rr.com>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2005 2:00 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] Kudzu invasion!


I apologize for laughing, but what is there to figure out where kudzu is
concerned? After all, it is the plant that ate the South. If the State
of
TN didn't keep after it, it would cross the highway through our town in no
time flat. The upside is constant attempts to control it provide a lot of
jobs. I had no idea it had any connection with soy bean rust, and there
are
lots of soy beans grown around here. That must be a recent development.
zem
zone 7
West TN
----- Original Message -----
From: "Kitty" <kmrsy@comcast.net>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2005 8:00 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] Kudzu invasion!


I don't know how they decide to do these things. I suppose they can't
track
every stand that pops up, so when they have some identified and
accessible,
they'll study it for awhile to help figure out what will happen from the
inaccessible and those they don't find. Still, it will just keep
marching
on...I wonder how southern Illinois is doing.
Kitty
neIN, Z5
----- Original Message -----
From: "Donna" <gossiper@sbcglobal.net>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2005 6:09 PM
Subject: RE: [CHAT] Kudzu invasion!


Man this paper of yours sure is packed full of wonderful news :(

Since this plant is so well known for taking over the world and
associated
other problem...

Can some one tell me why when it hit the Indiana border someone didn't
spray
it with round up ?!? Seems to me it would have been easier to control
it
when it first landed there, then now....

Donna


AP story in today's paper:

"INDIANAPOLIS - Kudzu, that notoriously fast-growing vine that covers
vast
tracts of the South, has spread its green, choking blanket to at
least
28
Indiana counties, posing a threat to woodlands and the state's
soybean
industry.
"Purdue University recently began studying some of the more than 70
patches
of kudzu in the southern half of the state after stands of the
invasive
vine
in Florida were found to harbor a deadly fungus that preys on
soybeans.
"Soybean rust has not yet been found in Indiana, but plant
pathologists
believe it is only a matter of time before the fungus shows up in the
state.
The fungus began devastating soybeans in South America three years
ago
and
reached US fields last fall, spreading as close to Indiana as
Tennessee
and
Missouri. Kudzu's early leafing vines would provide an early target
for
the
fungus' wind-borne spores to infect before spreading to soybeans
later
in
the season, said Glenn Nice, a weed scientist with Purdue's extension
service.
"Earlier this month, Nice and his colleagues visited three
kudzu-infested
sites in southern Indiana as the vines were starting to bud.  Some
had
diameters of 2 inches and were intertwined with smaller vines to form
a
dense thicket.
"As part of his research, Nice is interested in whether Hoosier Kudzu
is
the
same as the vines found in the South and how Indiana's infestations
got
started [does global warming come to anyone's mind? (Kitty)] Purdue
staffers will monitor some of the state's kudzu stands for signs of
the
soybean rust fungus throughout the season...."
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Island Jim
Southwest Florida
27.0 N, 82.4 W
Hardiness Zone 10
Heat Zone 10
Minimum 30 F [-1 C]
Maximum 100 F [38 C]

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