hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: Jesse's lavender


> From: Bonnie Holmes <holmesbm@usit.net>
>  
> When planting, dig hole and put in water and sit the potted plant
to be
> planted separately in water for 1 hour.  Plant and don't water for
three
> days.  The plant may stress somewhat but it will be stronger once
the roots
> are established.  
----------

Great info, Bonnie...but the above makes me scratch my head.  Did the
presenter say WHY not to water for 3 days?  I realize these plants
don't want soggy soil, but this bit doesn't make sense to me, nor the
part about setting the potted plant in water for an hour - I assume
in the pot. Maybe the presenter was thinking about the fact that most
nursery plants are potted in a peat based media that can dry out very
quickly in the root area even if the top looks moist???  I've heard
of soaking bare root plants for an hour and that makes good sense,
since the roots are generally on the dry side from being exposed to
air...but a potted plant??

Personally, I unpot and wash or shake the nursery soil off the roots
of about everything I plant..then puddle them in and let them get on
with it.  Doing this ensures that the plant's roots make good contact
with the soil you're planting them in. 
 
In a really free draining soil, if it's hottern' the hinges of Hades,
I water the plants when the soil is dry.  Even the plants in my sand
bed...these plants want sharp drainage but not desert conditions:-)

Marge Talt, zone 7 Maryland
mtalt@hort.net
Editor:  Gardening in Shade
-----------------------------------------------
Current Article: Corydalis
http://www.suite101.com/welcome.cfm/shade_gardening
------------------------------------------------
Complete Index of Articles by Category and Date
http://mtalt.hort.net/article-index.html
------------------------------------------------
All Suite101.com garden topics :
http://www.suite101.com/topics.cfm/635

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Support hort.net -- join the hort.net fund drive!
http://www.hort.net/funds/



Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index



 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement