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Re: soggy tropicals


I read a novel by a gardener once where the main character did that. She
would select a planting site months in advance and bury her kitchen waste.
By the time she was ready to plant, ta-da! Beautiful soil.



Andrea H
Beaufort, SC


> [Original Message]
> From: Bonnie Holmes <holmesbm@usit.net>
> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> Date: 8/19/2005 8:18:00 PM
> Subject: Re: [CHAT] soggy tropicals
>
> Kitchen mulch is collecting all non-diary, non-meat, non-cooked plant
> material from your meal makings, such as coffee grounds, melon rinds,
> tomato heads, parts of lettuce that don't look nice and are usually thrown
> away, washed out egg shells.  I put mine into a large cat food bucket that
> has a snap-on lid.  When it is full, I dig a hole in the bed I am making
or
> improving, put in the "kitchen mulch" and cover it over with dirt.  I
might
> put a shovel full of bark mulch on top if it is the growing season.  The
> kitchen mulch attracts earthworms and helps to break up the clay.
>
> Bonnie ETN Zone 7
>
>
> > [Original Message]
> > From: kmrsy <kmrsy@netzero.net>
> > To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> > Date: 8/19/2005 10:06:02 AM
> > Subject: Re: [CHAT] soggy tropicals
> >
> > What is kitchen mulch?
> >
> > Kitty
> > neIN, Z5
> > ----- Original Message ----- 
> > From: "Bonnie Holmes" <holmesbm@usit.net>
> > To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> > Sent: Friday, August 19, 2005 7:15 AM
> > Subject: Re: [CHAT] soggy tropicals
> >
> >
> > > One method I have used for working with clay is to bury kitchen mulch
in
> > > the place I want to make into a new bed.  I do this for months and
cover
> > > the gradually developing bed with mulch to keep down weeds.  The bed
> soon
> > > has earthworms and better soil.  The Trail Gardens at Knoxville UT has
> > > problems with clay in spots.  On other method they use is to develop
> > raised
> > > beds of good soil.  With raised beds, the plants have good drainage
and
> > can
> > > be better seen.  If I want a good deep bed, I start with the mulch
> method
> > > and add top soil on top to have a raised area.
> > >
> > > Bonnie ETN Zone 7
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > > [Original Message]
> > > > From: David Franzman <dfranzma@pacbell.net>
> > > > To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> > > > Date: 8/18/2005 1:39:26 AM
> > > > Subject: Re: [CHAT] soggy tropicals
> > > >
> > > > Hi Cathy
> > > >
> > > > When I first landscaped my yard I took a suggestion from Marge and
> dug a
> > > > hole in my clay and filled it with water.  The water stayed in the
> hole
> > > for
> > > > three days before it finally was absorbed.  I gave in and bought 50
> > yards
> > > of
> > > > top soil and covered the clay two feet deep.  Bananas, like many
> > > tropicals,
> > > > like plenty of water but they want it to drain out and not sit in
> > soaking
> > > > soil.
> > > >
> > > > David
> > > > http://www.atouchofthetropics.net
> > > > ----- Original Message ----- 
> > > > From: "Cathy Carpenter" <cathy.c@insightbb.com>
> > > > To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> > > > Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 2:06 PM
> > > > Subject: Re: [CHAT] Starting a nursery/David!
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > > Drainage may be a good part of the problem, as we have heavy clay
> > > > > here. All were on a slope, though, and I guess I thought that
> > > > > slope=drainage. The one that survived was in the most protected
> spot,
> > > > > next to the koi pond, but it was the most abused, losing the
growing
> > > > > plant that I received (something broke it off at soil level) and
> > > > > having to produce a new keiki that first year. Go figure.
> > > > >
> > > > > Cathy, west central IL, z5b
> > > > >
> > > > > On Aug 17, 2005, at 12:13 AM, David Franzman wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > >> Hi Cathy
> > > > >>
> > > > >> That's odd because they are 20' tall here.  I have three groves
of
> > > > >> them.  I can understand them freezing but if they survived the
> > > > >> winter I don't know why they wouldn't grow.  Does your soil drain
> > > > >> well?
> > > > >>
> > > > >> David
> > > > >> http://www.atouchofthetropics.net
> > > > >> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Cathy Carpenter"
> > > > >> <cathy.c@insightbb.com>
> > > > >> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> > > > >> Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 7:23 PM
> > > > >> Subject: Re: [CHAT] Starting a nursery/David!
> > > > >>
> > > > >>
> > > > >>
> > > > >>> Tried them here. Of three, one made it through the winter (with
> > > > >>> protection). The sprout from that plant has not gotten taller
than
> > > > >>> 3", thought it appears healthy. Thind I will dig it up, put it
in
> a
> > > > >>> pot, and bring it in for the winter.
> > > > >>>
> > > > >>> Cathy, west central IL, z5b
> > > > >>>
> > > > >>> On Aug 16, 2005, at 8:56 PM, David Franzman wrote:
> > > > >>>
> > > > >>>
> > > > >>>> Hey Holli, I told you on the phone about Musa basjoo.  Hardy to
> 10
> > > > >>>> or 20 below freezing.  There seems to be a difference of
opinion
> on
> > > > >>>> that.  The fruit is not edible and the bananas are about the
size
> > > > >>>> of my ring finger. But the pod and subsequent hanging fruit is
> very
> > > > >>>> cool.  Ok, that's just a start.
> > > > >>>>
> > > > >>>> Did you get those hibs repotted?
> > > > >>>>
> > > > >>>> David
> > > > >>>> http://www.atouchofthetropics.net
> > > > >>>> ----- Original Message ----- From: <Hollikft@aol.com>
> > > > >>>> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> > > > >>>> Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 6:11 PM
> > > > >>>> Subject: Re: [CHAT] Starting a nursery/David!
> > > > >>>>
> > > > >>>
> > > >
> > >>>
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> > > > >>> message text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT
> > > > >>>
> > > > >>
> > > > >>
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> > > > >
> > > > >
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> > > >
> > > >
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