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Re: was Haggis/now history of food

Linda wrote:
Janet, I've seen several TV garden tours in Scotland, and they can grow
things that are not hardy here.  So I went to Wunderground to check some
statistics.  For a few of the major cities, the average winter lows are not
even below freezing.  The days are pretty short this time of year, but that
means the days are extra long in summer, and with all the rain they get,
they can grow a huge variety of plants.  High humidity can be unpleasant in
cold weather, but at least in populated areas, the weather doesn't sound
very daunting.

Linda in Wyoming
True enough, but consider this. The southernmost part of Scotland,
on the Irish channel is about the same latitude (55 deg. N) as the
southrenmost part of Hudson's Bay, the middle of Saskatchewan, and the
souhernmost part of coastal Alaska. While they may have long summer
days, there aren't very many _of_ them.
About this haggis:  Scotland must have an extremely short growing season.
Plus, it appears to be 90% rock and the timber line is so low.  I think
Jim Fisher
Vienna, Virginia USA
38.9 N 77.2 W
USDA Zone 7
Max. 105 F [37 C], Min. -0 F [-17 C]

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