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Re: Orchids

I have a cattleya hybrid that has just finished blooming, ditto for the phalaenopsis (I am obviously not an orchid fanatic). I have always wanted to try the hardy terrestrials in my garden, but don't want to perform major modifications on the environment. Surely, given the size of the Orchidaceae family, there must be a member or two that like the living conditions in west central IL????
On Monday, December 23, 2002, at 07:10 AM, Gene Bush wrote:

I have only 6 orchid plants on the little table in front of the window
next to my desk. The Path now has 3 buds formed that will be opening before
long. (Bredko Garnet). Following the slipper orchid I have a moth orchid
with two bloom stalks spaced about 3 months apart on when they started. That
means this one will be in bloom almost all of this coming year. Orchids are
the only houseplant I have. Wish I had room for more, but I am terrible
about taking care of house plants, so probably god protecting innocent
I also, and probably more so, enjoy my hard orchids out in the garden.
Have a couple of species slipper orchids out there resting now. The
Spiranthes you mention is out there in the form of tiny green resting buds
and mini-leaves at soil level. There are several other of the "lesser"
species or orchids other than the ladyslippers that everyone is so
fascinated with. I happen to like these little quiet beauties as much as the
larger more show species in my woodland garden.
So many plants to play with....
Gene E. Bush
Munchkin Nursery & Gardens, llc
Zone 6/5 Southern Indiana
----- Original Message -----
[Original Message]
From: grdengrl <grdengrl@optonline.net>
I wish I could do that.  But no orchid I'm afraid is hardy in my zone.
if I placed them on trees I'd have to be prepared for them to not make

Of course you can't put them in trees, but do you grow any hardy orchids?
I would think you could grow Spiranthes (4-7)

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