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Ilex opaca


Speaking of hollies....Has anyone grown Ilex opaca, american Holly north
of Zone 6? I'm supposed to find one for the display gardens, but we're
in Z5, and all my references say 6. anyone?


--
Kitty 
neIN, Zone5

-------------- Original message -------------- 

> I like Ilex glabra (Inkberry Holly), Itea virginica (Virginia 
> sweetspire), and Clethra alnifolia (summersweet). All have been growing 
> fine in my clay, and like moisture. The latter two are deciduous. 
> Cathy 
> On Saturday, February 19, 2005, at 10:13 AM, "" 
> wrote: 
> 
> > Thanks Andrea, I was thinking of the dwarf Yaupon hollies but didn't 
> > know how much moisture they could stand. That laurel sounds nice too! 
> > 
> > 
> > Pam Evans 
> > Kemp, TX 
> > zone 8A 
> > ----- Original Message ----- 
> > From: A A HODGES 
> > Sent: 2/19/2005 7:34:35 AM 
> > To: gardenchat@hort.net 
> > Subject: RE: [CHAT] shrubs for damp clay 
> > 
> > Pam, I had that problem here and have found that Dwarf Yaupon Holly can 
> > take it, as can almost any holly, but my preferred shrub for foundation 
> > planting is Otto Luyken Laurel (Prunus Laurocerasus 'Otto Luyken') It 
> > stays small, evergreen, very dark leaves, and blooms twice a year with 
> > white spikes in spring and fall. Used to be hard to find but now Lowes 
> > and 
> > Home Depot carry it here. 
> > 
> > A 
> > 
> > 
> > Andrea H 
> > hodgesaa@earthlink.net 
> > EarthLink Revolves Around You. 
> > 
> > 
> >> [Original Message] 
> >> From: 
> >> To: 
> >> Date: 2/19/2005 8:27:49 AM 
> >> Subject: [CHAT] shrubs for damp clay 
> >> 
> >> I know there are plants that like wet feet (bog plants) - but are 
> >> there 
> >> shrubs that can take damp clay? Asking for a friend at work whose 
> >> house 
> >> stands in the lowest area of the property and the clay around the 
> >> foundation stays damp most of the time. Anything he plants will have 
> >> to 
> >> max out at 4-5 feet. TIA y'all! 
> >> 
> >> 
> >> Pam Evans 
> >> Kemp, TX 
> >> zone 8A 

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