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Re: what kind of >tummy


Well, how about slathering his tummy with Carmex? It'll heal the skin and he won't lick because it would taste so bad.

Kitty
neIN, Zone 5
----- Original Message ----- From: "Theresa G." <macycat3@sbcglobal.net>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2008 10:00 AM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] what kind of >tummy


Yeah- it would be nice to have a fully furry cat- but that doesn't bother me so much. The problem is when he also licks the skin raw and gets repeated skin infections.....
We are doing yet another round of antibiotics...

Theresa
Kitty wrote:
Theresa,
Odd that you should mention this. Just this morning I noticed that Jack is sporting a lush, thick, tummy full of fur after years of nakedness. I tried everything including Valerian and Bitter Apple with little luck. My vet said it's just an anxiety sort of thing. Something was bothering him. He's older and calmer now.

It's not something really to worry about other than the increased fur he ingests creating hairballs. It's not like he has to be concerned about life in the frozen Tundra.

Kitty
neIN, Zone 5
----- Original Message ----- From: "Theresa G." <macycat3@sbcglobal.net>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2008 11:36 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] what kind of mulch???


Well- I can't afford more than 3 inches, and I haven't mulched anything in years- so i think I'm safe on both accounts. Didn't get to go look at any mulch today- instead took the darn cat back to the vet. He's licked the fur off his belly AGAIN!

Theresa

Kitty wrote:
doesn't cedar mulch do the same thing?
Eventually. But cedar, redwood, cypress, these are all woods that are used for furniture, fencing, etc because they don't degrade quickly. Which is nice when you are building something, but not of any real benefit to your soil. People use these mulches for the very reason that they don't decompose, thinking they won't have to replenish it every year. Then they go ahead and add more every year anyway to "freshen" the color that has gone drab. Before you know it they've got a foot of mulch and they're killing their plants.

These aren't 'bad' mulches, they just don't provide one of the main benefits I look for in a mulch. If you use them, just try not to go thicker than 3 inches. Oh, one other thing, some of these will matt and actually form a moisture barrier. The rain hits and runs off rather than through the mulch. If this occurs, be sure to rough it up periodically.

Kitty
neIN, Zone 5
----- Original Message ----- From: "Theresa G." <macycat3@sbcglobal.net>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Monday, February 11, 2008 11:12 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] what kind of mulch???


doesn't cedar mulch do the same thing?

Theresa

Kitty wrote:
bark breaks down and replenishes the soil.  humus is important.
Kitty
neIN, Zone 5
----- Original Message ----- From: "Theresa G." <macycat3@sbcglobal.net>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Monday, February 11, 2008 8:57 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] what kind of mulch???


Thanks for the offer, but don't think I need any extra #!@% right now. There is shredded cedar mulch. I'm going to go by and give it a look tomorrow afterwork. Added bonus, it is cheaper than the bark nugget stuff. Now to try and guess how much I need...

Theresa

Johnson Cyndi D Civ 95 CG/SCSRT wrote:
I've had really good luck with shredded bark, we buy it at the
landscaping place by the cubic yard. It spreads easy, does a good job of holding water in the soil and looks nice for about 3 years. When we get it I spread it about 4" to 6" thick. I have heard that you get problems due to lack of nitrogen as it breaks down but I have not noticed that in my garden. If you have a lot of small plants you have to be careful not
to smother them while you're spreading it.
Spoiled hay with sheep manure is really good for your soil, but looks like, ummm, what it is and besides you might have problems finding it in your neighborhood. But I'd be glad to donate if you want to pick up. Free horse manure too, all you want. Give me a couple weeks notice and
I'll throw in 50 pounds of chicken poo.

Cyndi


-----Original Message-----
From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On
Behalf Of Theresa G.
Sent: Monday, February 11, 2008 3:53 PM
To: gardenchat@hort.net
Subject: [CHAT] what kind of mulch???

Spring is here! If they'd had tomato plants at Capital Nursery, I would

have bought them today : )

Anyway- I want to mulch my gardens well this year (trying to save money

on the water bill!)- so looking for advice. What kind of much is best for water conservation, good for the soil, won't breakdown in only one season, etc.??? Shredded, nuggets, bark, cedar, redwood????? Anybody
know anything about this?

Theresa

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