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Re: Composting citrus


My experience is that when composted, all organic material becomes
somewhat neutral in pH; doesn't matter what it was to start out with.
 I've put citrus rinds in my compost for over 30 years; they seem to
degrade along with the rest of the stuff. Now, I don't put massive
quantities in there at the same time, but a grapefruit or 3 a week
makes no diff.

Marge Talt, zone 7 Maryland
mtalt@hort.net
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----------
> From: SallyAnn <safart@aug.com>
> 
> don't think it's the same acidity.Soil PH can hardly ever be
changed
> permanently-or so I've read...& almost all composting books say to
use
> kitchen scraps
> SAinSA
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: <romans810@juno.com>
> 
> > Would the acidity, depending the amount used, change the ph???
> >
> > Tony Veca <><
> > Another Gr888 Day in Paradise !!!!!
> > Vancouver, WA
> >
> >
> > On Mon, 27 Jan 2003 16:46:12 -0500 "SallyAnn" <safart@aug.com>
writes:
> > > Yes, but the thinner you slice the rind-the quicker -as it is
pretty
> > > tough!
> > > SAinSA z9
> > > ----- Original Message -----
> > >
> > > > Jim and others in the citrus belt,
> > > >     Do oranges and grapefruits compost easily? My brother
sent me
> > > a box of
> > > > them for Christmas and I wanted to do something useful with
the
> > > skins.
> > > >
> > > > thanks
> > > >
> > > > Betsy

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