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Re: Amer. Gardener article/Wild Greens

> From: cathy carpenter <cathyc@rnet.com>
> How long have the invaders been in your garden? You could be
> with multi generations. Can give you my reference if you like.

You know, Cathy, I really don't know.  I became aware of them about 5
 years ago, but didn't know what it was and didn't do anything about
it for the first few years until I woke up about 1999 and realized
they were taking over everywhere.  Then I did some research, found
out what it was and it's been battle to the death time since.  

I feel sure they were present for some time before I noticed them.  I
know I'm dealing with multi-generations as the seedbank has a soil
life of 5 years at least, according to my research.  So, even if I
clean an area, of mature plants, there are always some sprouting if I
have disturbed the soil (which invariably happens if you get the
roots out, which you have to if you don't want the plants
re-sprouting on you).  Where I'm digging beds in the woods, I get new
seedlings emerging as they are brought close enough to the soil
surface to sprout.  But, those I can deal with as they are pretty
evident in new beds.

Be interested in seeing your reference as my research indicated they
simply required a cold dormancy period to germinate.

Marge Talt, zone 7 Maryland
Editor:  Gardening in Shade
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