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Re: One project > cuttings


Should be easy to do. They're not quite as easy to propagate as the plain old asparagus fern, but easy enough. And even here, where they are quite common, people still buy lots of them. Every year HD will get a large shipment--couple of hundred plants, I'd guess--and they don't last three weekends.


On Saturday, January 1, 2005, at 02:40 PM, Kitty wrote:

Yes, it is Asparagus densiflorus, possibly 'Meyersii'. It is not
'Sprengerii'.
I realize it's pretty common, but it's non-ordinary up here, so I thought
they might return my investment if I wintered them over and sold all but one
off in my April sale.

Kitty

----- Original Message -----
From: "james singer" <jsinger@igc.org>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Saturday, January 01, 2005 2:08 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] One project > cuttings


They grow continuously here, Kitty, if you're talking about that plumey
asparagus fern.

On Saturday, January 1, 2005, at 02:12 PM, Kitty wrote:

Dies back ?
Hmmm, I wonder if I should be letting them die back so they can rest
rather
than pushing them to grow continuously.

Kitty

Island Jim
Southwest Florida
27.0 N, 82.4 W
Zone 10a
Minimum 30 F [-1 C]
Maximum 100 F [38 C]

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