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Re: invasives


John Leland's "Aliens in the Backyard; Plant and Animal Imports into
America", University of South Carolina Press, 2005, 235p with notes and
index and Hannah Holmes' (no relation) "Suburban Safari; A Year on the
Lawn", Bloomsbury Publications, 2005, 262 p with notes also cover the
natives and naturalized.  "Aliens" covers more and in more detail; Suburban
Safari concentrates more on her Maine property.  


> [Original Message]
> From: Zemuly Sanders <zemuly@comcast.net>
> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> Date: 1/8/2008 12:12:39 PM
> Subject: Re: [CHAT] invasives
>
> I do know that Buddleias are considered weeds in Britain, at least the
area 
> around London.  I guess my problem is that so often lists of invasives
are 
> so generalized that they include plants that are not a problem all over. 
I 
> wish Box Elder trees were placed on a "destroy on sight" list here.  I
must 
> pull out many hundreds of seedlings every year.  I also wish residential 
> developments were placed on the invasive list.  They are destroying all
our 
> natural beauty, IMHO, not to mention the animals whose habitats are being 
> destroyed.
> zem
> zone 7
> West TN
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: <pulis@mindspring.com>
> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> Sent: Tuesday, January 08, 2008 7:42 AM
> Subject: Re: [CHAT] invasives
>
>
> > No, I haven't, but I will ask the library to get it for me on 
> > inter-library loan.
> >
> > While it is true that in many countries, plants have traveled freely, 
> > there are still many parts of the world that have been relatively 
> > (emphasize Relatively) free from intrusion. Some of these have
extremely 
> > tight import restrictions and eradication programs today.
> >
> > I hope that Ms. Baskins distinguishes between  "native" and
"naturalized." 
> > Some of our common weeds were brought here by the colonists for food or
as 
> > medicinals. As such, they've been here for a long time. That doesn't
mean 
> > that they're not changing, or even damaging, local ecology.
> > Privet, one of our most expensive and damaging pests, was in this
country 
> > by the mid-1800's . It was first noticed as a pest in 1950, and now is 
> > costing millions of dollars per year in removal costs. It severely
damages 
> > the eco-system around woodland streams, and its removal is not only 
> > difficult, but wholesale removal leaves streambanks in danger of
erosion, 
> > with severe sedimentation downstream.
> >
> > Don't get me wrong. I'm not a "natives-only" nut, but I think we all
need 
> > to be more aware of the potential for some plants to get out of
control, 
> > and to educate ourselves about the habitats that can be damaged by our 
> > choices. I used to pooh-pooh the invasive plants lists until I
discovered 
> > how plants travel, and that they're tied more to the site than the
state.
> >
> > I'm betting that Callery (Bradford-type) Pears and Crapemyrtles will be 
> > the next big pests in my part of the world. Chinese Hollies and
Eleagnus 
> > are starting to pop up everywhere, too, in addition to the 
> > before-mentioned Nandinas and Mahonias. Duchesne and Japanese Bamboo
Grass 
> > (Microstegium- not Bambusa) are also a threat. Buddleias weren't a
problem 
> > until a couple of years ago. They're starting to spread, too. And then 
> > there's Ivy...
> >
> > d
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----- 
> > From: "Andrea Hodges" <andreah@hargray.com>
> > To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> > Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2008 11:54 AM
> > Subject: Re: [CHAT] invasives
> >
> >
> >> Daryl-have you read "A Plague of Rats and Rubbervines" by Yvonne
Baskins? 
> >> It's one of my assigned readings for my oral defense. LONG book but 
> >> interesting so far. I had no idea that pretty much very little in most 
> >> countries is a true native for centuries past.
> >> A
> >> ----- Original Message ----- 
> >> From: "Daryl" <pulis@mindspring.com>
> >> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> >> Sent: Sunday, January 06, 2008 6:51 AM
> >> Subject: Re: [CHAT] Lonicera fragrantissima
> >>
> >>
> >>>A common misconception is that invasive plants are only invasive in an 
> >>>area immediately surrounding them. This is rarely the case. Nandina
and 
> >>>Mahonia and Callery Pears are popping up all through the woodlands of 
> >>>Georgia, and even plague my landscape. They're all escapees from 
> >>>landscape plantings.
> >>>
> >>> Many people think of Kudzu as being the premier invasive. It's not 
> >>> nearly as bad as those plants that have berries or seeds that the
birds 
> >>> eat spread like a metastatic cancer.
> >>>
> >>> Some plants do both, of course -think of Japanese Honeysuckle and
Privet 
> >>> and Oriental Bittersweet.
> >>>
> >>> We don't always see where they're going, since many of them need 
> >>> disturbed soil in which to take root, and that soil may be many miles 
> >>> away.  Some need the moisture  provided near creeks, and often pop up 
> >>> along streams in the woods, far from where we see them. Others may be 
> >>> held in check by local climate conditions, but take over when spread
to 
> >>> other areas.
> >>>
> >>> d  (Member of the Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council and instructor on 
> >>> Invasives and Their Control).
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> ----- Original Message ----- 
> >>> From: "Zemuly Sanders" <zemuly@comcast.net>
> >>> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> >>> Sent: Saturday, January 05, 2008 6:15 PM
> >>> Subject: Re: [CHAT] Lonicera fragrantissima
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>> Apparently that's not happening here.  The plant I got mine from is 
> >>>> ancient and only has suckers as far as the branches extend, which is 
> >>>> about 10-12 feet.  Sometimes I think the plant police get a little 
> >>>> hysterical. I've never heard of it being considered a pest in this
part 
> >>>> of the state.
> >>>> zem
> >>>> ----- Original Message ----- 
> >>>> From: "Daryl" <pulis@mindspring.com>
> >>>> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> >>>> Sent: Saturday, January 05, 2008 8:46 AM
> >>>> Subject: Re: [CHAT] Lonicera fragrantissima
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>> You should know that this plant is considered a pest in many parts
of 
> >>>>> the country, including Tennessee. I've never seen a berry on mine,
but 
> >>>>> I've kept an eye out.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> d
> >>>>>
> >>>>> U.S. Weed Information:
> >>>>> Lonicera fragrantissima Lindl. & Paxton
> >>>>>
> >>>>> January jasmine
> >>>>> sweet breath-of-spring
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> This plant can be weedy or invasive according to the authoritative 
> >>>>> sources noted below. This plant may be known by one or more common 
> >>>>> names in different places, and some are listed above. Click on an 
> >>>>> acronym to view each weed list, or click here for a composite list
of 
> >>>>> Weeds of the U.S.
> >>>>>
> >>>>>      SEEPPC        Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council. 1996.
Invasive 
> >>>>> exotic pest plants in Tennessee (19 October 1999). Research
Committee 
> >>>>> of the Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council. Tennessee.
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> d
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
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