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RE: Xeric was Bloomerang was back to gardening??
gardenchat@hort.net
  • Subject: RE: Xeric was Bloomerang was back to gardening??
  • From: "Johnson, Cyndi D Civ USAF AFMC 95 CS/SCOSI" <cyndi.johnson@edwards.af.mil>
  • Date: Wed, 16 Dec 2009 09:01:31 -0800

Do they average out the rainfall over the year? If ours were averaged it
would work out to something less than 1" per month. But almost all
precipitation falls between November and April, with the rest of the
year dry. We get an occasional summer thunderstorm but it doesn't happen
every year and they don't drop more than a few tenths of an inch.
My dry garden isn't quite so "super-xeric" as all that, I try to turn on
the sprinklers every couple weeks during the summer. I haven't been as
diligent about it over the last year and I've lost a couple sages and
some penstemons.
I have a little palm tree seedling in there that the birds planted, in a
good spot for it actually so I didn't dig it up. I'm waiting to see how
big it will get on so little water. It's maybe 3' tall now.
We may lose one of the Joshua trees in the back. Our horses can reach it
and they are gnawing through the upper trunk like beavers. Those things
are incredibly heavy, and the leaves are like daggers, we're afraid it
will break with them underneath. So either we move the fence and see if
it lives or just take it out.

Cyndi

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On
Behalf Of Betsy Kelson
Sent: Wednesday, December 16, 2009 7:28 AM
To: gardenchat@hort.net
Subject: Re: [CHAT] Bloomerang was back to gardening??

CSU has done some scientific research on several plant species to truly
determine their "xericness". Ususally, its 1" 1/2" and 1/4" per week
regimes. Once Lilacs are established they are not really water hogs.
I have my Korean Lilacs on the east side of the house growing in granite
sand no doubt. I walk by them every day and when they look wilty I water
them. Maybe once every two weeks in the heat of summer.

betsy
Evergreen co
----- Original Message -----
From: "Johnson, Cyndi D Civ USAF AFMC 95 CS/SCOSI"
<cyndi.johnson@edwards.af.mil>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Tuesday, December 15, 2009 11:03 AM
Subject: RE: [CHAT] Bloomerang was back to gardening??


> I was browsing around after looking up that lilac and I was surprised
to
> see the Colorado State Extension lists lilac as a xeric shrub. It is
in
> the same lists with apache plume (Fallugia paradoxa) and rabbitbrush
> (Chrysothamnus nauseosus), two shrubs in my dry garden. I just can't
> imagine them living with such little water. But Colorado xeric and
> California xeric must be two different things; no doubt Apache plume
and
> rabbitbrush are capable of living in much wetter conditions than I've
> got them in, conditions where lilacs can manage to hang on.
>
> Cyndi
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On
> Behalf Of Daryl
> Sent: Tuesday, December 15, 2009 5:56 AM
> To: gardenchat@hort.net
> Subject: [CHAT] Bloomerang was back to gardening??
>
> I have it and it rebloomed for me. It's very small and I keep it in a
> container here. No mildew. Not as fragrant as the lilacs that I
remember
>
> from home (Illinois and Wisconsin), but we can't grow many Lilacs here
> in
> the south.
>
> d
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Donna" <gossiper@sbcglobal.net>
> To: "gardenchat list" <gardenchat@hort.net>
> Sent: Monday, December 14, 2009 9:35 PM
> Subject: [CHAT] back to gardening??
>
>
> > In todays mail, I got a invitation to a gardening event.  One of the
> > plants
> > they are pushing... er talking about..... is a reblooming purple
lilac
>
> > called
> > Bloomerang (tm).
> >
> > Anyone heard of it?  Anyone have it?
> >
> > Sounds interesting, but somehow hard to believe in zone 5.
> Unfortunately,
> > I
> > would love to go to the luncheon, but my schedule isn't going to
allow
> it.
> >
> > Donna
>
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