hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

RE: Early American Pumpkin Butter --- great for gifts


Well...people should have common sense. People who act like morons and hurt
themselves shouldn't be able to sue for damages, or collect my tax money for
their long term care in nursing homes. However, it doesn't always work that
way. I agree that lawmakers can go overboard but I don't think attempting to
prevent people from killing themselves out of ignorance is such a bad goal.
Especially since actions in this area can cause sickness and/or death in
others. 
While you should never eat food that looks spoiled, botulism does not always
leave signs of its presence. If you're willing to risk it for yourself,
fine. But how about friends you might give gifts to, you willing to risk it
for them? Do they agree? If the one person who dies that year from botulism
caused by home canning in the oven is your spouse, would you still think the
guidelines are meant for morons? Do you remember those children dying from
E.coli in hamburgers, how do you think their parents feel now about food
safety laws?   
I'm not meaning to attack here, just want to say I am not willing to risk my
health when the alternatives are so easy to follow. This isn't sky-diving
after all, where risk is inherent. I will use every modern method I know of
to be safe and I will still be able to enjoy my hobby.  

Cyndi

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On Behalf
Of james singer
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2006 10:58 AM
To: gardenchat@hort.net
Subject: Re: [CHAT] Early American Pumpkin Butter --- great for gifts

"Putting Food By" is a very good book. So is "Keeping Food Fresh."

But I've got some discontent with USDA and UGA's continuing dumbing down of
"safety" guidelines; they seem to believe that "if some moron can screw this
up, we should declare it unsafe." I grew up at a time when most women canned
and most of them canned in the [gasp!] oven. I don't recall that botulism
was a national plague or even one of the top thousand causes of death--far
more people died from commercially preserved foods than died from home
canning. If it smelled funny when you opened it, you didn't eat it--unless
you were suicidal.

One thing that "Keeping Food Fresh" recommends is filling preserving jars
with water several days before using them to allow the nascent mold spores
to bloom before sterilizing them. Makes sense to me.

On Jul 28, 2006, at 12:50 PM, Johnson Cyndi D Civ 95 CG/SCSRT wrote:

> The sugar added is going to make it acid but the problem is that it's 
> so thick you can't be sure the sugar is evenly distributed. Same thing 
> with pressure processing, it is too thick to know that the contents of 
> the jar have been evenly heated.
> I look at it like driving. Chances are when I drive a car I am not 
> going to get into an accident. But I wear my seat belt because 
> something could happen, and why take an unnecessary risk when I don't 
> have to? You could process the pumpkin stuff and probably everything 
> would be okay...but if it weren't, the consequences are pretty nasty. 
> So you freeze it and avoid the risk without appreciable inconvenience.
> There are some people who scoff at the whole thing and figure if 
> grandma did it and didn't die, so can they. I don't eat anything 
> they've put up - the reward isn't worth the risk, even if it is small.
> A really good book that goes into details about the WHY of canning, as 
> opposed to just "do this step", is Putting Food By. Things make so 
> much more sense when you know the reasoning behind it. Like the story 
> of the woman cutting off the end of the roast.
>
> Cyndi
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On 
> Behalf Of Bonnie Holmes
> Sent: Thursday, July 27, 2006 8:20 PM
> To: gardenchat@hort.net
> Subject: RE: [CHAT] Early American Pumpkin Butter --- great for gifts
>
> I knew you had to be careful with tomatoes because the newer hybrids 
> have less acid than the older varieties but was not aware of problems 
> with pumpkin.  I always baked them in the oven which removes a lot of 
> the liquid (leaving it with the seeds) and produces a pretty thick 
> pulp.  I am also wondering if the lemon juice adds sufficient acid.
>
>
>> [Original Message]
>> From: Johnson Cyndi D Civ 95 CG/SCSRT <cyndi.johnson@edwards.af.mil>
>> To: gardenchat@hort.net <gardenchat@hort.net>
>> Date: 7/27/2006 12:54:28 PM
>> Subject: RE: [CHAT] Early American Pumpkin Butter --- great for gifts
>>
>> You guys know I can a lot of things and I am always concerned that I 
>> use
> the
>> latest techniques to ensure food safety. The National Center for Food 
>> Preservation says this is not safe. Here is a link:
>> http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publications/uga/uga_can_pump.pdf
>> Even with all the sugar added you cannot ensure that the pH of the 
>> food is low enough to prevent potential growth of botulism. Make it 
>> for yourself
> if
>> you must, and accept the risk, but please don't give it away.
>> And don't make any of those !(@# cakes in a jar, either.
>>
>> Cyndi
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On
> Behalf
>> Of Bonnie Holmes
>> Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2006 6:54 PM
>> To: gardenchat
>> Subject: [CHAT] Early American Pumpkin Butter --- great for gifts
>>
>> Early American Pumpkin Butter - makes 5 pints
>>
>> This recipe makes a lot of butter, and for a good reason; it serves 
>> as the perfect gift during the holiday season. The traditional 
>> spicing and hint
> of
>> maple sweetness will enhance old-fashioned holidays meals.
>>
>>
>> 6 cups cooked pumpkin puree (light cooking pumpkins are best)
>> 2 cups pure maple syrup (very important...don't skimp here)
>> 2 cups light corn syrup
>> 2 cups packed brown sugar
>> 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
>> 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
>> 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
>> 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
>> 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
>> 1/4 teaspoon ground mace
>> 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
>>
>> Put the puree in a 4-quart pot; stir in the maple syrup and corn 
>> syrup.
>> When these are thoroughly combined, add the remaining ingredients. 
>> Set the pot over medium-high heat. When it begins to boil, partially 
>> cover it; the mixture will splash profusely. Cook the puree at a slow 
>> boil, stirring frequently to prevent sticking, until it thickens and 
>> turns a darker color---about 45 minutes.
>>
>>
>> Ladle the butter into five sterilized, still-hot pint jars. Wipe rims 
>> and cap immediately with still-hot lids, plus rings. Process for 25 
>> minutes
> in a
>> boiling water bath.
>>
>>
>> To Make Pumpkin Puree
>> Either bake the fruit or boil it. To bake pumpkins (my favorite way), 
>> poke holes in the pumpkin to keep from exploding, put them in the 
>> oven whole,
> on
>> a cookie sheet, at 350 degrees F until softened and collapsed.
>> Scoop the pulp away from the peel. Puree the pulp in a blender or 
>> food processor. Or, boil, peeled chunks of fresh pumpkin until softened.
>> Then puree the cooked pulp. Or use two 29-oz cans of commercial 
>> pureed
> pumpkin.
>>
>>
>> Bonnie Zone 7/7 ETN
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>> To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the 
>> message text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>> To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the 
>> message text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the 
> message text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the 
> message text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT
>
>
Island Jim
Southwest Florida
27.0 N, 82.4 W
Hardiness Zone 10
Heat Zone 10
Minimum 30 F [-1 C]
Maximum 100 F [38 C]

---------------------------------------------------------------------
To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the message
text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT

---------------------------------------------------------------------
To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the
message text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT



Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index



 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement