hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

RE: Bees


Well, Jim, I've only seen this once before when a queen bee took up
residence on an old thorn tree in the far corner of our property.  Dad
explained that the outer swarm was covering/protecting their queen and the
layers of duty the different bees took.  We watched for a couple of hours
and when it looked like they were taking up a permanent residence there, Dad
got on the phone and called a local be keeper.  (I was terribly allergic to
bee stings.)  The bee keeper came out, cut the limb off the tree and took it
with him, all the bees still attached.  I would imagine these days a bee
keeper would use a smoker as you don't want your sago damaged!


Bonnie (SW OH - zone 5) 

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On Behalf
Of james singer
Sent: Wednesday, June 07, 2006 7:34 PM
To: Garden Chat
Subject: [CHAT] Bees

Looked out the front door a few minutes ago, and--
http://snipurl.com/rhq7 --a swarm of bees has camped out across the patio on
one of the presumed dead trunks of the queen sago. If you go to the picture,
then click on "next picture" you should get an enlargement of the proximate
middle of the swarm. Very hard to photograph--the wings of those on the
outside are flapping exceeding fast to keep that mass cool at the core.

Step one was to admire the swarm from as close as I could get comfortably.
Step two was to photograph them. I have no idea what step three is.

Island Jim
Southwest Florida
27.0 N, 82.4 W
Hardiness Zone 10
Heat Zone 10
Minimum 30 F [-1 C]
Maximum 100 F [38 C]

---------------------------------------------------------------------
To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the message
text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT

---------------------------------------------------------------------
To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the message
text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT

---------------------------------------------------------------------
To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the
message text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT


  • References:
    • Bees
      • From: james singer

Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index



 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement