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Re: The First Zucchini


Bumblebees are supposed to be the best squash
pollinators from what I've heard.

Theresa
--- Daryl <pulis@mindspring.com> wrote:

> I know of a guy who broke his neck when he touched a
> hot wire while 
> grounded. Apparently the jolt was enough, and he was
> at just the right angle 
> to snap it.
> 
> I touched one once through fabric (leaned too near a
> fence with hands in 
> pockets) while wearing wet shoes. It knocked me
> several feet back onto my 
> behind, and my teeth slammed together so hard that
> they ached for days.
> 
> That's odd about the hummingbird. I wonder how he
> hit it. I thought that dry 
> bird feet wouldn't conduct. Dunno about snakes.
> 
> We have some mason bees, but they don't seem to be
> efficient at squash and 
> cucumbers. I can grow the parthenocarpic cukes like
> 'Sweet Success', but I 
> haven't found a parthenocarpic zuch.
> 
> d
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Johnson Cyndi D Civ 95 CG/SCSRT"
> <cyndi.johnson@edwards.af.mil>
> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> Sent: Thursday, June 07, 2007 6:24 PM
> Subject: RE: [CHAT] The First Zucchini
> 
> 
> >I was working from a possibly apocryphal story
> Island Jim sent, about a
> > guy who foiled ground squirrels by zapping them on
> the hot wire. You can
> > kill a small animal with even the little fence
> chargers they sell for
> > dogs. I know this because we sadly discovered the
> bodies of a
> > hummingbird and a gopher snake when we had the hot
> wire up around our
> > property line. The strong ones will not kill a
> person (my sister knows
> > this from personal experience) or a sheep, goat,
> horse or what have you
> > - there would be no market if they did - but seems
> to me if the little
> > ones would take out a snake a strong one might
> well take out a rabbit.
> > But I don't really care how it works as long as it
> keeps them the heck
> > away from my veggies, other barriers are not doing
> the job for me. Dogs,
> > horses, and sheep in my experience do not sense
> the electricity until
> > they touch the wire, but it doesn't take more than
> twice for even the
> > dimmest animal to figure it out. Again, just going
> from personal
> > experience.
> > Too bad about the bees in your area, I guess we
> have been lucky here.
> > Maybe you should buy some mason bees?
> >
> > Cyndi
> 
>
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