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Re: Fundy mulch


Haven't heard of it before either.  I do know that back in the dark ages
when we did pond care, many people used the algae, aquatic plants they raked
out of the swimming areas for their garden mulch.  It seemed very good.
Now on the other hand our village has a pile of the chipper products from
village wide.  I a sure it has tons of bugs, termites, and other unwanted
visitors.  It is free for the taking but just can't bring myself to battle
that cause.  Any thoughts?

Vera


On 6/7/07, Donna <gossiper@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
>
> I have never heard of this.... let us know how it worked out. May try to
> find some when I use up the ant filled stuff I have on hand.
>
>
> Donna
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----
> From: "Aplfgcnys@aol.com" <Aplfgcnys@aol.com>
> To: gardenchat@hort.net
> Sent: Thursday, June 7, 2007 5:19:46 PM
> Subject: [CHAT] Fundy mulch
>
>
> We went shopping for mulch for the replanted front bed yesterday,
> and for salt hay for the garden.  I loathe the red stuff that is so
> popular around here, but thought maybe cocoa hulls would work.
> Instead we found something I had never seen before - Fundy mulch
> from Maine.  Made of old wood chips and kelp, it looks just like
> good black earth, and should add to the soil in due course.  It is
> certified for use in organic gardens.  A bit pricey, but seemed to
> me to be well worth it.  Maybe everyone already knows about
> this - I don't usually buy mulch, but didn't have any good compost
> this year - but I was delighted to find it.
> Auralie
>
>
>
>
> ************************************** See what's free at
> http://www.aol.com.
>
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