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Re: re: Bamboo


Not all bamboo is invasive. You just have to find the clumping
varieties. 

I think I mentioned this quite awhile back about this bamboo I have, that
I got in Colorado from my daughters neighbor who had it in a solar heated
greenhouse & haven't been able to identify it. I dug up a clump & brought
it home & potted the divisions up . That first winter I almost lost them.
The soil froze in the pots, but lo/ behold, they came back. It gets about
2' high, spreads slowly. I have a couple in large pots & one large clump
planted on the edge of my patio. In cold weather quite a few of the
leaves turn a "tan" color & will drop off, but there's always some green
leaves. I'm going to plant a small clump out in the open. It seems to
tolerate full sun, but looks better in partial shade. Will keep you
posted.

Tony Veca <><
Another Gr888 Day in Paradise !!!!!
Vancouver, WA
 
On Mon, 10 Mar 2003 04:58:25 -0500 (EST) "Melody" <mhobertm@excite.com>
writes:
> Zem: Not all bamboo is invasive. You just have to find the clumping
> varieties. And it does make a lovely screen to hide unattractive
> features of the landscape. Most bamboo I've seen in nurseries is 
> very
> clearly labeled as either clumping or spreading. The spreading kind 
> is
> downright hostile if living in a jungle is not what you want, 
> though, so
> be doubly sure! :-)
> 
> 
> Melody, IA (Z 5/4)
> 
> "The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious."    
> --Albert Einstein
> 
>  --- On Sun 03/09,  < Zemuly@aol.com > wrote:
> From:  [mailto: Zemuly@aol.com]
> To: gardenchat@hort.net
> Date: Sun, 9 Mar 2003 10:33:38 EST
> Subject: Re: [CHAT] weather rant  flooding weekend chores
> 
> In a message dated 03/08/2003 5:44:25 PM Central Standard Time, 
> Cersgarden@aol.com writes:
> 
> 
> > Zem, you need some of them 9' four oclocks!
> >     
> 
> LOL!  Good idea.  I've thought about some of the wild bamboo that 
> grows 
> around here, but I know that in no time I'd be living in a forest of 
> it. <LOL>
> 
> zem
> zone 7
> West TN
> 
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> 



Tony Veca <><
Another Gr888 Day in Paradise !!!!!
Vancouver, WA

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