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Re: New mango


Originally, along the back fence [board-on-board, 6 feet high] we cleaned out the whole thing, laid our irrigation lines, put down an 8-foot wide strip of weed mat, then mulched the weed mat. The idea was that when we wanted to plant something in that zone, we could scrape aside the mulch, cut through the weed mat, dig a hole, and plant. Since then, the only serious thing we've planted in that area is a lychee tree, and that was several years ago. In the meantime, the mulch has turned to compost and a growing ground for weeds. In addition, much of this zone is under some very tall slash pines, so it has also accumulated pine needles, pine cones, and shattered pine branches in a 3- to 4-inch thick layer.

The upshot is that when I got serious about planting the mango, I cleaned up an 8 foot by 8 foot area. Five 42-gallon bags worth. The good part is that with the mango planted in the center of the area, the area becomes a target for RoundUp--we control the weeds in all of the footprints of our trees with RoundUp and Rout. Especially citrus trees; they do not like anything under their footprint--not weed mat, not grass, not mulch. [To make them look tidy, landscapers mulch them with washed beach sand, which they tolerate as long as the layer is very thin.]



On Mar 31, 2005, at 2:21 PM, Donna wrote:

hum-- you need to make it public Jim... or
something.:)

I just have one question, just what are you clearing
out to replace with all these treasures you are
planting this week?

Donna

--- james singer <islandjim1@verizon.net> wrote:
Cleaned out an area in the back yard today and
planted a new mango
tree, a "Carrie." This is our third mango. There's
only one more we
want to add, a "Nam Doc Mai," but we'll probably
wait a couple of years
before we do it. Still have a papaya, two
pineapples, and a variegated
schefflera to plant, but I'm going to wait until
tomorrow AM; it's 85
in the shade here right now.

Here's a link to a picture of a succulent in bloom.
Can anyone ID it?
The florets are about the size of a dime.


http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/jsinger2003/detail?.dir=/
8210&.dnm=2dbb.jpg&.src=ph

Island Jim
Southwest Florida
27.0 N, 82.4 W
Hardiness Zone 10
Heat Zone 10
Minimum 30 F [-1 C]
Maximum 100 F [38 C]


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Island Jim
Southwest Florida
27.0 N, 82.4 W
Hardiness Zone 10
Heat Zone 10
Minimum 30 F [-1 C]
Maximum 100 F [38 C]

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