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Re: Tree Peony Propagation


if they were my seedlings, i would not obstruct the process, although i might seek a second opinion on what that process is or should be. and, depending on how many seedlings there are, i might try several different strategies simultaneously.

and never give up on cycads. if the seeds were firm and fresh to begin with, eventually most of them will germinate. sometimes, as with some palms, they may take a couple of years to get around to it.


At 08:31 AM 5/1/03 -0500, you wrote:
Ok, all you Paeonia propagation experts out there - my tree peony seeds have finally begun to germinate! I read in Druse's book that they require a two step germination process: first sending out a radicle, then needing a cold period (winter or simulated winter) before developing leaves. Well, I had them in a bag of damp peat moss and was about ready to give up on them after 5+ months, but when I checked today I saw a radicle! After a bit of excited rejoicing (maybe I won't give up on the cycad seeds either) it occurred to me that the second step may be problematic. I'm supposed to pot them up and place them in the refrigerator for 12 weeks, then when they come out, they should continue the germination process to sprout leaves -- right in the middle of fall! So what do I do then? I will have some very confused plants to get back on track. Guess the question is - should I / can I hold the seeds in the peat until fall, then pot them and refrigerate? Should I pot and refrigerate right away and then grow under lights all winter (means buying grow lights, but I need to do that anyway)? Will the anticipated plantlings then get themselves back in normal rhythm when I set them in the garden in spring after growing all winter?
Thanks,
Cathy

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