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Re: conifer recommendation??


Or maybe a shrubby willow. The arctic willow is a lovely thick bush. Does get rather stiff branches after a few years, Stooling mine has worked beautifully. I whack it back to an 18 inch stump every other year & it grows lovely long soft switches that sway like grass & smell like rain. Takes it just 4-6 weeks to regain enough heft to block my view of the neighbor's shed. Seems it could be trimmed to make a nice thick hedge, too. A bonus is, if you cut it back to large branches, it puts out growth all along those branches. No persistant bare spots if you trim too close. The one I have in full sun was 8-12 feet high & wide. The one in shade is about the same tall but narrower.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Theresa -yhoo" <tchessie@yahoo.com>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Monday, May 01, 2006 8:25 PM
Subject: Re: [CHAT] conifer recommendation??


So I'm thinking River Birch might also be a deciduous
option. There are several weeping willows in the far
back of the property doing very nicely.  Also, in
answer to Bonnie's question, they've been told they
are mildly acid for soil.

Theresa

--- Josh Haskell <haskell@ncweb.com> wrote:

Theresa,

Does she really mean pine trees? If so
Bonnie is right on the mark.
But a lot of people use "pine" as a synonym for
"evergreen". In that case,
I would consider Thuja plicata, which thrives in
moist environments and does
tolerably well in most conditions. But also
consider a variety of
evergreens (with some deciduous plants mixed in)
rather than creating a
monoculture. If there is sufficient space there are
lots of alternatives.



Josh Haskell


Ohio -- zone 5


----- Original Message ----- From: "Theresa -yhoo" <tchessie@yahoo.com>
To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
Sent: Monday, May 01, 2006 12:38 PM
Subject: [CHAT] conifer recommendation??


> Hi all-
>
> I'm at my sister's house in WNY, I believe she is
> somewhere between zone 5 and 6. Anyway, they want
to
> plant a row of "pine trees" between their house
and
> the neighbors for some privacy. Problem is, that
area
> tends not to drain very well, so likely will have
wet
> feet for part of the winter. Anybody have
suggestions
> of what might live? Gets sun more than half the
day,
> soil is poor, clay like and with gravel.
>
> thx, Theresa
>
>

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