hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: was Cyclamen / now Master Gardeners


My theory is that the Master Gardener program is more activist, educational
and community minded.  You see the same thing with Habitat for
Humanity...lots of men volunteer.  Not to stereotype but I think men
respond more when there is a definite goal or project.  In our area, men
seem to join organizations that are very active and/or very specific, such
as learning to work with specific plants or environments (water gardens) or
building a specific park or playground.  I noticed this in the corporate
setting also.

It may also have to do with generation.  I remember attending a seminar on
volunteers.  The speaker pointed out that various generations had different
"hooks" to get them to volunteer.  The most senior are attracted by a sense
of "doing good, assisting a worthwhile institution or organization", the
baby boomers more attracted by a sense of helping their family members or
by having a set assignment to be done at a set time based on their
recognized skills, and the next generation attracted by being able to work
with their friends..."this is what needs to be done, can you get a group of
your friends together to help."

This might be an interesting study for a social anthropologist.  Know any?

Bonnie Zone 6+ ETN




> [Original Message]
> From: Gene Bush <genebush@otherside.com>
> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> Date: 11/09/2003 5:45:00 AM
> Subject: Re: was [CHAT] Cyclamen / now Master Gardeners
>
> Well, Zem or Bonnie, or whoever..
>     Any theories on why Master Gardener chapter would have more active
males
> than the usual garden club or organization? Come to think of it Alpine
> Gardening seems to be made up of a very strong male component. Does not
seem
> to be just a local thing here as I read from your guys.
>     Inquiring minds not only need to know they seem to kind of stuck on
this
> aspect of gardening participation this morning.
>     Gene E. Bush
> Munchkin Nursery & Gardens, llc
> www.munchkinnursery.com
> genebush@munchkinnursery.com
> Zone 6/5  Southern Indiana
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> > In a message dated 11/8/2003 8:03:33 AM Central Standard Time,
> > genebush@otherside.com writes:
> > I am surprised at the number of males in MG classes here
>
> > Not Bonnie, but at least half the Master Gardeners in Madison County,
TN,
> are
> > men.  I don't know how we could maintain some of our projects without
> them.
> >
> > zem
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the
> message text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT

---------------------------------------------------------------------
To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@hort.net with the
message text UNSUBSCRIBE GARDENCHAT



Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index



 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement