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RE: National Weather


Cathy, thanks so much for the info.  My pond is a little pre-formed pond
with no plants or fish yet.  I plan to change that next spring.  It does
have a bell fountain, but I don't think the pump has enough "umph" or the
pond enough depth to keep an area "ice free."   With your advice and I can
put the pump, etc in the basement (no frost there!) and it will stay
protected.

Blessings,
Bonnie

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On Behalf
Of Cathy Carpenter
Sent: Monday, November 08, 2004 4:12 PM
To: gardenchat@hort.net
Subject: Re: [CHAT] National Weather

Not Donna, but the answer depends on the pond, or more specifically, 
the pump. If you have no living things to preserve, I would just drain 
it, but if you have a pump to produce a fountain, waterfall, etc, you 
will have to store it, in water, in a frost-free area until spring. In 
our big pond, where we over winter our koi, the pump is kept going 
through the winter, but the pond is large and deep enough to allow 
enough air exchange, as long as the pump is working. In the ponds that 
have just plants, we move the tropicals to our basement under grow 
lights and leave the hardies to fend for themselves. Those have done 
just fine, as natural precipitation has given them enough moisture 
until spring.
Cathy

On Sunday, November 7, 2004, at 05:04 PM, Bonnie & Bill Morgan wrote:

> Donna, would your recommend I drain my new little pond for the winter? 
>  We
> have no fish or plants in it now, but look forward to working on that 
> in the
> spring.  Or is it better to leave some water in it?
>
> Blessings,
> Bonnie (SW OH - zone 5)
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On 
> Behalf
> Of Cathy Carpenter
> Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2004 9:36 PM
> To: gardenchat@hort.net
> Subject: Re: [CHAT] National Weather
>
> Dry here for the weekend and temps may get into the 60s, which means DH
> is going to drain and clean the ponds. It will entail catching and
> transferring all fish to a very large tub - and then trying to prevent
> them from jumping out (and chasing them if they do) until the cleaning
> is done and the pond refilled. I am NOT looking forward to it!
> Cathy

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