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Re: link on stinky plant


You're nowhere as far behind in reading this list as I am, Ceres:-)

Well, voodoo lily is a common name for at least 3 genera of aroids:

Sauromatum guttatum, now Typhonium venosum,  Synonyms: Arum cornutum,
S. venosum;
Amorphophallus - any one of about 200 species - all from mostly
tropical climates;
Dracunculus vulgaris (AKA Arum dracunculus)

I have lost Sauromatum in the garden; have one Dracunculus that's
hanging in outside in the garden - so one is hardy for me and the
other isn't quite tho' I do know Sauromatum is hardy in Holland and
slightly south of me.  Have not tried overwintering either of these
inside but would hazard a guess that they would take cooler dormant
temperatures and may not want to get completely dry since they can
overwinter outside in the garden....won't swear to this, however:-)

I grow 4 different Amorphophallus species - one in the ground (A.
konjac) and 3 in pots - A. bulbifer, A. paeoniifolius and A. dunnii. 
All are overwintered in their pots; allowed to go dry but kept in the
laundry room where daytime temps approach 68-70F.  I have read posts
on Aroid-L from those who remove the tubers from their pots and keep
dry in the house on shelves, desks or hung in net bags on the theory
that the pots don't dry out well enough and the tubers may rot if
they don't, as mature tubers from the most common species need to be
kept dry in dormancy.  Immature tubers and those that make long
skinny tubers need to be kept just damp or they will desiccate.

Your donor said he'd potted bulblets - well, a. bulbifer makes these
at the junctures of the leaf blade, so I wonder if that's what you've
got?  Did it have a marvelously patterned stem as well as a very neat
leaf?  http://snipurl.com/kcqd

So, in answer to your question, if your voodoo is an Amorphophallus,
the temp. under your stairs would be the only issue.  If it stays 50F
or above they'd be fine there; if it gets colder you need to shift
the pot upstairs to some corner where it's warmer.  If it's one of
the others, it would probably be fine.

Marge Talt, zone 7 Maryland
mtalt@hort.net
Shadyside Garden Designs

----------
> From: Cersgarden@aol.com
> I am a bit behind but   your conversation regarding stinky plants
reminded me 
> of a plant a gentleman gave me this past summer that he called
Voodoo Lily.   
> The foliage is stunning and I loved it in his garden.   He gave me
a pot of 
> what I think he said were bulblets that he had potted. He said they
were not 
> hardy for him so I left them in the pot, let the foliage die off &
stored them 
> in the basement under the stairs as I do my Eucomis, Sprekelia,  
Zephyranthes, 
> etc.   Think this was a good choice?

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