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Re: Re: Re: Re: Heating the indoors, the yard outside,too...and a question...

  • To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
  • Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: [CHAT]Heating the indoors, the yard outside,too...and a question...
  • From: "Marge Talt" <mtalt@hort.net>
  • Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 03:15:11 -0400

Well, Bonnie, I don't grow your particular cultivar - which I read is
a dwarf form, so should stay smaller than the Chamaecyparis pisifera
'Filifera Nana' that I have.  Mine, after about 28 years in the
garden are working on being 20' tall and trying to completely close
in over the steps to the front patio, despite my continual pecking
away at them.  Extremely lovely conifers; natural wide cone shape.  I
think mine were about 30" tall when I got them and they got moved
once after I'd had them about 3 years.

I thought 'Nana' meant small...if it does, I wonder what size the
non-nana get to be?

I've been thinking of trying to make a tunnel; let them just grow
together and carve out an opening to the steps because pruning them
is ladder work and incredibly tedious since they need to be hand
clipped to retain their graceful drooping branch form - plus they
don't sprout out of old wood with no foliage on it.  

Only thing that stops me is that they tend to get bare in the inside
where there's no light and I'm afraid that there wouldn't be enough
light inside the arch for foliage growth...that wouldn't be so
pretty.  I've seen these openings in hedges in the UK, but did not
really pay enough attention to what was happening inside the
opening:-(

If  your child is in a 1 gal. pot, it's gonna be a long time before
it's big enough to block much in the way of traffic...they are not
fast growers when young....seems to me that mine stayed relatively
small for about 10 or 12 years.  They now grow faster than I'd like,
considering the pruning needed:-)

Marge Talt, zone 7 Maryland
mtalt@hort.net
Editor:  Gardening in Shade
Shadyside Garden Designs
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----------
> From: Bonnie & Bill Morgan <wmorgan972@ameritech.net>
>  Sungold Threadbranch Cypress (chamaecyparis pisifera 'SunGold.'
For
> $2.50 in a one gallon pot.  Has anyone grown the cypress I got? 
I'm trying
> to decide whether it would work in front of the Walnut trees out in
front of
> the South side of the property facing the 50 mph street.  If it
grows the
> 8'X12' that the tag says, that would block a lot of noise and be
low enough
> the power company won't be whacking at them all the time.  How fast
do they
> grow?  I could afford to get several to interplant in front of the
house if
> they will do what I'd like.

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