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Re: help ID and moving instructions?

It's not what I think of as an African Daisy, Osteospermum, but it does
look related judging by the whorled leaves. Regardless of what it is,
when you dig it up you will be severing some roots, so it stands to
reason that you'd balance the top by cutting some of that back too.
Usually 1/3 on a shrub.

If on the other hand this is a perennial like the Osteospermums, when I
took mine in the first time, I cut it back by at least 1/2. It sprouted
new growth indoors over winter and guzzled water. Now I just take
cuttings as they are very easy. Since this looks much like an Osteo, if
I were you I'd try rooting some of the material you remove. What I found
with osteos though is that LESS is better; too much material and you get
tip dieback.

Yes, go ahead and dig it up.  I doubt you'd need to be very delicate with it; looks vigorous.


-- Vera Metzke <vmetzke@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi All,
Sorry have been out of the loop but been trying to keep up reading mails.
Donna was kind enough to load some pictures for me. Earlier this year I
asked about the supposed African Daisy bush. I have photographed it with the
flowers and the internals exposed. I want to move it but am unsure if an
aggresive pruning will kill it? I can do a very delicate moving of all
intact but it would be easier to "clip it's wings"! Any suggestions on it's
true idenity or moving it?


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