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RE: A washingtonpost.com article from: islandjim1@verIzon.net

  • To: gardenchat@hort.net
  • Subject: RE: [CHAT] A washingtonpost.com article from: islandjim1@verIzon.net
  • From: "Bonnie Holmes" holmesbm@usit.net
  • Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2006 14:00:46 -0400

Agree...1 acre wouldn't do it in most cases.  In many places, even 40 acres
was insufficient to support a family...that experiment has been tried.  

One of my brothers-in-law tried THE FARM in TN...a commune of sorts.  He
left after waking one very cold morning, finding the fire was out, no one
had brought in wood, no one had chopped wood, and, when he went to do it,
although not his assigned chore, the axe was dull.


> [Original Message]
> From: Johnson Cyndi D Civ 95 CG/SCSRT <cyndi.johnson@edwards.af.mil>
> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> Date: 9/8/2006 11:41:35 AM
> Subject: RE: [CHAT] A washingtonpost.com article from: 
islandjim1@verIzon.net
>
> Some time ago I watched a few of the PBS programs like "Colonial House"
> and "Pioneer House" and I was thinking, I could do better than those
> people did, they spent half their time griping about things instead of
> working. But I suppose there's got to be conflict or viewers don't
> watch. It does get you thinking about what you really would need to live
> on. 
> I was interested in the comments about self-sufficiency in the
> Washington Post article. I used to read a homesteading magazine and
> there was always one person writing in, ranting about how every family
> should have an acre and they could be self-sufficient, the world would
> be so much better. Maybe my definition is different because I think
> there are very few places in the world you could truly be
> self-sufficient, and your life would be primitive.  Where do you get
> salt or sugar to preserve your food, where do you get tools, how do you
> transport heavy items, what happens if your water dries up? What happens
> if you get sick? There's reasons that humans gather together in
> communities, life is easier with others to share the work. That was true
> even when they lived in caves. 
> Anyone reading my posts know we eat a lot of what we grow ourselves from
> my garden and the sheep and chickens we raise. I don't have any fancies
> that we are self-sufficient. In a different climate much of what I do
> would be easier of course; we could graze the sheep instead of buying
> hay, we could have our own water source, it would be easier to store
> things like onions or potatoes - or depending on the climate, things
> would grow year-round. But to live without reliance on anything other
> than ourselves? Not likely.  
>
> Cyndi
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On
> Behalf Of Bonnie & Bill Morgan
> Sent: Friday, September 08, 2006 7:27 AM
> To: gardenchat@hort.net
> Subject: RE: [CHAT] A washingtonpost.com article from:
> islandjim1@verIzon.net
>
> My husband's parents moved to Colorado when they retired.  They lived in
> a log cabin with a windmill to draw water from their well and used a pot
> bellied stove (just like my Uncle in Jasper always did) to heat the
> house, and a small propane refrigerator.  They had no phones or
> electricity.  I think I could live like that too, though I would most
> certainly miss some of the conveniences we have and I would truly miss
> the communications systems
> we use!   We do keep oil lamps available and have the fireplace...just
> in
> case.  We worked at learning some of what they had experienced because
> on never knows when one might need to use skills learned by our
> predecessors.
>
> Blessings,
> Bonnie
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On
> Behalf Of Bonnie Holmes
> Sent: Friday, September 08, 2006 9:58 AM
> To: gardenchat@hort.net
> Subject: RE: [CHAT] A washingtonpost.com article from:
> islandjim1@verIzon.net
>
> Great article.  Cultural history always has a pull for me.  (For those
> interested in mid-western, western life, Pioneer Woman is full of great
> tid-bits, such as what you do when your sod house leaks.)  There were
> times, especially during the Cold War when I wondered how long I could
> sustain myself on my little bit of property.  Each time we have a
> serious black out in this area (usually after major ice storm), the
> people who get along best are those older folks who were raised on farms
> before electricity.  I wonder if the commune popularity during the late
> 60s and 70s were an attempt to mirror sustainability.  Ah, you can see
> that I am in a reflexive mood this a.m.
>
>
> > [Original Message]
> > From: <islandjim1@verIzon.net>
> > To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> > Date: 9/7/2006 8:58:49 AM
> > Subject: [CHAT] A washingtonpost.com article from: 
> > islandjim1@verIzon.net
> >
> > You have been sent this message from islandjim1@verIzon.net as a 
> > courtesy
> of washingtonpost.com 
> >  
> >  Personal Message:
> >  For those who grow edibles.
> >  
> >  A Shrinking Homegrown Crop
> >  
> >  By Barbara Damrosch
> >  
> > One of the Web sites I check out regularly, Kitchen Gardeners 
> > International (
> >
> >     http://www.kitchengardeners.org
> >
> > ), is the work of an American named Roger Doiron. His stories are 
> > always interesting, but his news is not always good. In March, he 
> > posted a
> U.S.
> > Department of Agriculture chart showing the...
> >
> >  
> > To view the entire article, go to
> >
> >    
> http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/09/06/AR200609
> 0600
> 461.html?referrer=emailarticle
> >
> >
> >  
> >  
> >  Would you like to send this article to a friend? Go to
> >
> http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/emailafriend?contentId=AR200609
> 0600
> 461&sent=no&referrer=emailarticle
> >  
> >  
> > Want the latest news in your inbox? Check out washingtonpost.com's 
> > e-mail
> newsletters:
> >
> >
> http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?node=admin/email&referrer=email
> arti
> cle
> >
> > Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive
> > c/o E-mail Customer Care
> > 1515 N. Courthouse Road
> > Arlington, VA 22201
> >
> > ) 2002 - 2006 The Washington Post Company
> >
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