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Re: Hanna


My parents lived in the Harrisburg, PA area in '72, their neighborhood was isolated by the flooding, but they were on high ground and didn't flood. There are no guarantees in life, but it pays to use common sense when buying property and making emergency plans. The problem comes when you are trying to decide on a major purchase such as a generator - making that expense, yet knowing you may never use it...
Cathy
On Sep 6, 2008, at 5:44 PM, Pam Evans wrote:

True enough. Tropical Storm Agnes was not what you'd call an impressive storm system. But when she parked herself over the Susquehanna river basin and poured down rain for a solid week, she caused broken levees and whole valleys to flood. At the time (1972) Agnes was the worst storm in terms of property damage in US history. I haven't lived in a flood plain since.

On 9/6/08, TeichFauna@aol.com <TeichFauna@aol.com> wrote:

A stalled tropical storm can flood a city.........we had 48 inches of rain in Houston a couple years back with Tropical storm Allison. More rain than
with any hurricane that ever came through this area.    A stalled
rain  system
(non-tropical) can dump more rain than some hurricanes, as many areas that never see tropical systems can relate to. We had 10+ inches a month ago,
some
was associated with Eduoard, but most was not. We didn't get a drop of
rain
with Rita, just heavy winds, even though landfall was east of Houston, but
we
were on the clean side. A fast moving storm does a lot less damage than
a
stalled system. Also depends if one is on the dirty (right) or clean
(left) side of a tropical  system.

I agree, one should always be prepared, never know what can happen at any
time......
Noreen
zone 9
Texas Gulf Coast

In a message dated 9/6/2008 5:16:26 PM Central Daylight Time,
dp2413@comcast.net writes:

A forecast 2" can turn into a couple of weeks without water or power.

d







**************Psssst...Have you heard the news? There's a new fashion blog,
plus the latest fall trends and hair styles at StyleList.com.
(http://www.stylelist.com/trends?ncid=aolsty00050000000014)

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--
Pam Evans
Kemp TX
zone 8A

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