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Re: need a fruit tree idea


What about a fig?  


> [Original Message]
> From: james singer <islandjim1@comcast.net>
> To: <gardenchat@hort.net>
> Date: 9/22/2008 9:36:32 AM
> Subject: Re: [CHAT] need a fruit tree idea
>
> Avocados grow and fruit in the Bay area and downtown Sacto, but they  
> get truly huge [beware of a dwarf called Don Gillogly [something like  
> that]; it's a scam, fruit is terrible].
>
> Loquat should do fine. Get a named variety if you can; fruit is much  
> better. If you get a small one, you can train it to be a shrub.  
> They're quite plastic; take all sorts of pruning without complaint.
>
> Not subtropical, but French/Italian plums do well there, are  
> productive, and stay relatively small. Pistachios are small trees, but  
> I think you need two.
>
> For an interesting eastern-US native, you might consider the pawpaw.  
> Plant breeders have worked overtime on it during the last couple of  
> decades and there are some really good varieties available now.
>
> I checked lychees and cherimoyas, and even if you fudge a half zone,  
> you're still to cold for them. And, of course, I'll think of a dozen  
> others as soon as I send this. :)
>
>
> On Sep 21, 2008, at 9:14 PM, Theresa G. wrote:
>
> > Ok- I was going to try to plant another apple tree, but was advised  
> > against this by master gardener friend, as we have been getting  
> > warmer and warmer and apples were marginal here in the first place.   
> > So- now I'm on the hunt for a new fruit tree.  Something that stays  
> > relatively small, has yummy fruit, and wants to be in my overly warm  
> > climate.  Kind of wondering is something semitropical might make it  
> > here??  Ideas??  Jim- any input? Maybe a loquat?  Would an avacado  
> > grow here (or do they just get huge?)
> >
> > Theresa
> >
> > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
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> >
>
> Island Jim
> Willamette Valley
> 44.99 N 123.04 W
> Elevation 148'
> Hardiness Zone 8/9
> Heat Zone 5
> Sunset Zone 6
> Minimum 0 F [-15 C]
> Maximum 102 F [39 C]
>
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