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Re: dying hosta & trees



----- Original Message -----
From: <Marekmohr@aol.com>

>>>under what kind of trees?....what impact do they have on the
hosta....the
willows in my yard have caused rot on a few plants...my theory is that
the
tree stressed the plant the year before, making it susceptible to the
rot the
following year....they caused the rot, by compacting the soil and
draining
every drop of water from the soil.....
<<<<<

Ken,
Your theories sound good, but, I believe you are barking up the wrong
tree!

 I have southern blight in approximately 30 hostas. Some are under
Crabapples, some under oaks, some in the shade of the house, some in
almost full sun.

Also, some of my hostas with southern blight were growing very well,
were quite large, and showed no signs of stress from  tree competition.

Host + Pathogen + Environment = Disease

Hosta + Southern Blight Spores + three days above 95f with high humidity
or rain = southern blight.

There are "white molds" that affect plants other than southern blight. I
have seen hostas lose leaves and have only found the mycelium(that why
the name "white mold") with no characteristic mustard seed size fruiting
bodies(as is usually found with southern blight). There are other fungi
closely related to southern blight that cause disease problems in ag
crops and I believe some of these may be affecting hostas also.

My hostas with southern blight do not have the "odor" that you have
described.

The terms "southern blight" and "crown rot" do not refer to the same
disease. These two terms seem to be used interchangeably leading to much
confusion.

Dan Nelson



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