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Southern Blight in Vegetables---Kentucky Extension Service


Here's some information off the web from the Kentucky Cooperative
Extension Service

Here's their web address:
http://infoseek.go.com/?win=_search&sv=M6&lk=noframes&nh=10&ud9=IE5&qt=s
tem+rot&oq=&url=http%3A//www.uky.edu/Agriculture/IPM/sponsprj/annsum89.h
tm&ti=University+of+Kentucky+IPM&top=

=====================
PPFS-VG-3

SOUTHERN BLIGHT

 Paul Bachi
  (Revised 7-94)

Southern blight affects a wide variety of crops, but the disease most
commonly occurs in Kentucky on ajuga, beans, cabbage, cucumbers, pepper,
soybeans and tomato. Other susceptible plants include apple, columbine,
coreopsis, eggplant, lupine, peanut, peony, phlox, potato, rhubarb,
sweet woodruf, tarragon and vinca.

SYMPTOMS

Southern blight causes a sudden wilting of the foliage, followed by
yellowing of the leaves and browning of stems and branches. The wilting
and dying result from a decay of the stem or crown at the soil line.
Infected tissues are frequently covered with a white, fan-like fungal
mat. As the disease progresses, numerous small, round fungal bodies
(sclerotia) appear embedded in the fungal mat. Initially the sclerotia
are white; later becoming light brown, reddish brown, or golden brown in
color. Each is about the size of a mustard seed.

CAUSE AND SPREAD

Sclerotium rolfsii is the agent of southern blight. This fungus survives
as mycelium and sclerotia in the soil and in decomposing plant residue.
The fungus is moved by running water, on infested soil particles
clinging to cultivating tools, on infected plant material, and as
sclerotia mixed with seeds. Disease development is enhanced by high
temperatures and humidity. The disease is also more severe where
undecomposed organic matter is left on and in the soil. Sclerotia enable
the fungus to survive adverse conditions.

CONTROL

1. Remove infected plants, whenever practical. This can most easily be
done in gardens and landscapes. Dig up infected plants being sure to
remove the surrounding soil and plant debris. Steps should be taken to
avoid allowing sclerotia to drop back onto the planting site.

2. Thin the planting to improve air circulation and drying. Moisture
trapped within a dense plant canopy will favor disease development.

3. Practice crop rotation using less susceptible plants such as corn,
sorghum, small grains, and grasses.

4. Deep plow fields or gardens early to bury sclerotia and to allow for
the complete decomposition of plant residues. Sclerotia will not survive
as well when buried at least 6 inches.

5. The use of the fungicide PCNB (Terraclor) at the time of planting may
also aid commercial growers in controlling the disease on crops labeled.
Be sure to consult the label before making this application, however, to
insure the use is labeled and to obtain specific use directions and
restrictions.


------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------

CAUTION! Pesticide recommendations in this publication are registered
for use in Kentucky, USA ONLY! The use of some products may not be legal
in your state or country. Please check with your local county agent or
regulatory official before using any pesticide mentioned in this
publication.

Of course, ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS FOR SAFE USE OF ANY
PESTICIDE!

------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------

Educational programs of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service serve
all people regardless of race, color, age, sex, religion, disability, or
national origin.



UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, KENTUCKY STATE UNIVERSITY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE, AND KENTUCKY COUNTIES, COOPERATING

==============================

This info was match 171 out of 186,529 on an internet search.

Lots of disease information on the web. I find it interesting to read
how the same disease is controlled in different crops. Most research is
based on agricultural crops because that's where the big money is.

Some disease control measures used on vegetables are not practical on
hostas. Crop rotation and deep plowing are two that come to mind.

Dan Nelson
Bridgeville DE
zone 7
SussexTreeInc@ce.net


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