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Plant Core Temp / Nutrient Availability

  • To: "Hosta" <hosta-open@mallorn.com>
  • Subject: Plant Core Temp / Nutrient Availability
  • From: "Daniel Nelson" <sussextreeinc@ce.net>
  • Date: Wed, 18 Aug 1999 10:16:57 -0400
  • References: <38340259.24ec0823@aol.com>

Oh I forgot to add, that just like humans a plant will transpire more
extremely hot weather than during cooler days.

West Seneca, NY

I was just reading in the August 1999 issue of Arbor Age an article
about tree nutrition.

I quote:

"When air temperatures rise above 88f transpiration rates taper off

Of course, Marty Shaw, the author was talking about trees. I am sure the
same thing is occurring in other plants. When transpiration decreases
nutrient availability  also decreases because most nutrients for plants
are dissolved in water. Lack of water in the soil would have the same
effect on nutrients moving into the plant.

Does high air temperature and low soil moisture lead to summer dormancy
in some hostas?

My guess is yes, because both conditions lead to nutrient deficiencies
in the plant even if the nutrients are in the soil.

Does high air temperature, high soil moisture and the spores of southern
blight lead to southern blight?

My guess is yes, again.

So what does a hosta gardener do when it is hot and dry?

I suffer right along with my hostas.

Dan Nelson

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