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Seasonal Musings and Wishes

  • Subject: Seasonal Musings and Wishes
  • From: gw1944@vermontel.net (Glen Williams)
  • Date: Sat, 21 Dec 2002 09:30:48 -0500

Fellow Hosta Brethren:

It's been quiet  on the robins (except for mountains of spam) and I wanted
to pass along  the view from my window. The snow had been reduced to a
crusty 4 inches.  There is some stubble in  the gardens; those last plants
that never got cut down before the early surprise of winter. Not that it
had anything to do with my procrastination. No, not that.  The Ilex 'Blue
Boy' holly is spectacular this year and have been able to share a lot with
neighbors . This is the bargain for my leaves on their well raked lawns in
the fall.

The leaves on all the rhododendrons are all down at half mast, like
umbrellas not quite closed. There are some small evergreens which have been
totally covered with snow, and now the melting snow, rain, and  fresh
powder , make them look like small amorphic snowmen getting ready to attack
the cement Buddha. Tell me why non-gardeners insist on giving garden
sculptures to people who garden?  And then demand to see them each year?
This person even cut down  HOSTA LEAVES, so that the Buddha would be
visible. A jade Buddha would have been nice, but cement tends to miss the

I made the weeping pine into a archway this summer and it looks like a
giant hairy green croquet hoop now. Much of the tall plumed grass that I
had tied up early in November is now lodged at precarious angles , waiting
to be flattened by a really big snow storm. Despite my clumsy efforts it
still looks nice.

I lost a standard form Viburnam in an earlier storm, and despite the
incredible smell and beauty of the flowers , I won't miss it. I had taken
the Wayside Garden blurb seriously and believed that it would stop at a
height of 6 feet. It finally went down at 9 feet plus. I am already
imagining something else there; before the body is even cold. Well, that
last statement is a bit hyperboletic considering the time of year.

The driveway is black ribbon of ice as are the walks. The boxwood which I
started to shape this last summer, now looks like a dead camel. Seasonal
perhaps, but not a happy image. I was aiming for a sculptural wave:
something like a Branncusi (sp?) maybe...and ended with this grim memorial.
Maybe I shouldn't mess with mother nature.  Or just lower my aim to a lumpy
green bush.

Wayside Garden catalogue came the other day and I discovered that I have
once more been lured into sending in an order. The double Echinacea and the
red Coreopsis were too tempting. And I know , despite compatible zones and
constant care, that these will go the way of other such tempting
perennials. Still,hopes springs eternal for this gardener and the promise
of hope with feathers on it, will always gets my attention.

From my winter garden to yours, have a wonder-filled  winter solstice, and
a lush and lusty spring.  Glen W.

"The first law of intelligent tinkering is to keep all the parts."
Glen Williams
20 Dewey St.
Springfield , Vermont
Tel: 802-885-2839 

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