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I suppose
> this could be determined today with modern science being what it is, but it
> wouldn't be easy. It would probably be safer to call it a sport until proven
> otherwise.
Hi Bill
Are you trying to say all variegated plants that turn back green should
be considered sports until proven otherwise or for some reason just

   I meant this to apply to all apparent reversions. As Jim Hawes said, a reversion is a type of sport in which the original tissue reappears. I'm just making the point that they are not necessarily what they seem. I couldn't guess at what percentage are actually the appearance of a new but similar- looking tissue, but there are more of these than most people seem to think. They aren't interesting or exciting to most people, so are just written off and forgotten as oddities. In the Kevin Vaughn article posted at the First Look website, he mentions a 'Frances Williams' with a twisted scape. This is the sort of thing I am referring to. If a plant like Joe's that was dismissed as a reversion then sent up a twisted scape it would be apparent that it was not the return of the original tissue in the center, but the appearance of something new.
   Hostas produce more sports than are readily apparent. Many are just not noteworthy.
                                                                                                           .......Bill Meyer

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