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Re: Daylily Vs. Hosta

  • Subject: Re: Daylily Vs. Hosta
  • From: gw1944@vermontel.net (Glen Williams)
  • Date: Sun, 17 Feb 2002 11:05:43 -0500 (EST)

Hi Bill.....2 inches and counting here, but who needs to count.

You wrote:

 I think the answer to that is there in
>the daylily market. If you TC a hosta, you know within a few months if the
>plants are true to form, while you'd have to wait for a daylily to flower to
>be sure you were,nt propagating on a mutation (not necessarily a good one)
>instead. That would mean that the lab wouldn't really be able to sell them
>with any real certainty they were right for a long time. It isn't as easy as
>hostas are. That's one part of it.

****The answer above sounds like sense to me.


>         The other part is the sheer number of daylily varieties. How many
>new hostas make it into TC every year? Thirty? Forty at the most. If you
>have five hundred or more new introductions every year, than less than ten
>percent ever get TC'ed. As long as there are a lot of new varieties being
>produced, than the majority will never see the TC lab. So, there will always
>be a collector end of the market where TC is a dirty word for varieties that
>never met the test tubes.

***** Your response above would indicate that if we only had a few more
hundred hostas every year that would be in the same position as the daylily
crazies...but as you indicated the turn around time on hostas  makes
responding with tc far easier in our funkia world.
>

One other factor is the lingering question of whether the TC
>hostas remain true to the form of the original. Often TC plants do look
>different from the OS plants, particularly in the area of margin width. For
>an example go to 'Captain Kirk' at the HostaLibrary. The OS plant,

****What you have indicated above should be a hotter topic than it is.
Still TC has given us a quicker turn around on sports and mutations which
is both a curse and a benefit. The curse: TOO MANY HOSTA  NOT GROWN FOR AT
LEAST 5 YEARS ARE NOW ON THE MARKET. ALSO AS YOU POINTED OUT THERE IS NOT
ALWAYS CONSCIENSCIOUS QUALITY CONTROL.......AND SOMETIMES  THE DIFFERENCES
DON'T SHOW UP TO 3 YEARS OUT OF TC.
>
YOU ALSO WROTE:          Anyway, I think the high-end collector market will
always be
>there, and that it is just reeling a little from seeing the choicest, most
>expensive and coveted plants being reduced in value overnight to $5 liners.
>It will recover, as the daylily market has, and it will be concentrated more
>on things which will not do well in TC,


****HERE I THINK YOU MAY BE WRONG here BILL. YOU MAKE A REASONABLE CASE,
but that turn around time is still a major factor. The high end of hostas
may not return and that would be a pity. That PRICE ABOVE RUBIES IS ALWAYS
A FACTOR...  and the BIG MAC a reality. With the reproduction methods now
avaiable, and many aspects of quality in the eye and taste of the beholder,
price and quality may not be cojoined. This is the source of some of the
myth and mystery of hostas which are such an incentive for some of us. I
expect that an even greater hosta underground, where plants are withheld ,
may make its way on to the scene with a vegance.

Glen






"And yes I said yes I will Yes." J.J's last words.
Glen Williams
20 Dewey St.
Springfield , Vermont
05156
Tel: 802-885-2839 


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