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Re: Journal: Hosta info or social club


Ray R., Clyde C., and Dan N. wrote;
RE:>>Some comments about the AHS Journal and the mix of articles.

I took a minute this AM to peruse some older email messages.  I came across some posts that struck at the very heart of why the Editor-in-chief position is one of great responsibility while simultaneously being "no man's (or woman's) land".

There seem to be at least three major arguments being posited regarding content of the Journal:
1) The AHS Journal should be a notch or two above local Hosta Societies newsletters, in the depth of knowledge required to readily comprehend the articles being offered.  This would help fulfill the more advanced needs of collectors, hybridizers, professionals, and serious gardeners, perhaps with a certain percentage allocated to each of these major categories.  (Ray' (below) and Clyde's position?).
2) The AHS Journal should be a more general, gardener-oriented magazine because it has to appeal to the broad interests of it's entire membership.  The Journal should facilitate the increased use of Hosta in the landscape (Andrew's Position?) while being the official "newsletter" of the AHS.  However, a separate scientifically oriented "magazine" should be developed for those with a more scientific orientation, perhaps with a separate subscription rate but preferably having those articles posted to the web.
3) The AHS Journal should be more technical in nature, providing in-depth scientific articles which are not readily available from other sources (Dan's position?), with less emphasis on garden tour reviews.

Seems to me the current format of the Journal is doing a fairly good job of keeping folks happy except that the garden reviews may be redundant for those that DID attend the national convention.  Yet how does one distribute that information, and the info about the awards, presentations, the auction, and misc. if not through the AHS Journal?   Did I hear some recommendations that this info be contained in the Yearbook?

Are there any suggestions that I missed?  I am curious to learn where this discussion took us...

Andrew Lietzow
http://dev.hostahaven.com/discus -- A discussion forum for the serious HostaHolic.
 
 
 
 
 

RBRSSR@aol.com wrote:

In a message dated 01/06/2001 8:58:30 AM Central Standard Time, SMRDH@aol.com
writes:
 
My only suggestion for those that work on the journal is to dedicate a
specific percentage to scientific, pictures, gardens.... That way you get a
little of everything and not to much on one thing and this will keep most
people happy.

My personal preferences on Journal content are somewhat in line with Dan's,
but I certainly cannot disagree with the logic behind the AHS's current mix
to serve all members.

Those fortunate enough to live in an area where they can belong to a local
society, may be looking to the AHS Journal to be one knowledge level above
what they casually learn strolling through lovely gardens, and should be able
to read in their local society newsletters.

Long term, I believe we need more local societies and more people within
those societies willing to share their knowledge.  Then, maybe someday, the
AHS Journal could have a higher percent content of information for the more
serious gardeners, collectors, hybridizers, and professionals.
Ray Rodgers, Bartonville, IL, CIHS, Zone 5





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