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Re: Breeders' Rights

  • Subject: Re: Breeders' Rights
  • From: "Ransom Lydell" <ranbl@netsync.net>
  • Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2001 09:59:23 -0400

Joe
You are pretty much right in your observations.
That is why there needs to be an educational effort , to let "new" introducers know, that their "great new baby" is going to need a lot of testing, before being introduced for sale.  The "holder" can do this him /her self, or can hand it to a TC lab, and let the public "suffer"  Far to many untested "new" hostas are reaching the market in mass.  Every day, I hear comments like " I am very disappointed in that new plant I bought".  This , By the way seems to be the case in a lot of other plant groups as well.  ( roses are the worst here)  Can those of us producing and making a living from plants, expect this to go on and on.  I doubt it!  The serious buying/gardening public is becoming more educated.  Originators and suppliers, better pay attention.
Thanks
Ran
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2001 1:05 AM
Subject: Re: Breeders' Rights

When I go down and visit
Charlie Purtymun and look at all the hostas he has I have to wonder
how some of this stuff ever escaped the compost pile.  Some
hybridizers should be rewarded for their efforts, but some hybridizers
really shouldn't be rewarded at all.

Joe Halinar






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