hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: soil


In a message dated 5/14/00 8:31:48 PM Central Daylight Time, 
LakesideRM@aol.com writes:

<< Can anyone tell me how much pelted lime necessary to raise the pH from 5.5 
to 
 6.5? >>
One of my soil science books suggests the following for finely ground 
limestone:
(pounds per 1,000 sq ft.)

Northern and central states:
sands and loamy sands-30
sandy loams-55
loams-85
silt loams-105
clay loams-120
muck-225

Sothern Coastal States:
sands and loamy sands-20
sandy loams-35
loams-50
silt loams-75
clay loams-100
muck-200

It takes about 6 months for lime to appreciably increase soil pH, and soils 
will have to be relimed every 2-5 years due to the natural acidifying effects 
of biological respiration,organic matter mineralization and precipitation.

Hope this helps





Dave Drum
Wayzata Mn
Zone 4
---------------------------------------------------------------------
To sign-off this list, send email to majordomo@mallorn.com with the
message text UNSUBSCRIBE HOSTA-OPEN





 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index