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Re: cotyl


I probably shouldn't open my mouth, and I don't have any textbooks, but I have
germinated about a thousand million seeds over a few years and can add this much
to the discussion.  The first two leaves on dicots bear no resemblence to the
true leaves that will come afterwards.  On hostas, that ain't the case.  The
first leaf exhibits the characteristics of the leaves that follow.  That
probably can't be considered scientific proof of anything, but this forum has
been so boring lately that I'm willing to jump into any argument I can find.

Chick

"Joseph C. Halinar" wrote:

> Ben:
>
> >May I .. suggest friendly to look in any Botany book There is usually
> >a picture of germinating Allium or other member of the Liliales.
> >The thin threadlike cotyl ends in a haustorium absorbing food forom
> >the endosperm in side the black seedcoat. The first green leaf is
> >just that: the first leaf.
>
> I'm not sure just what it is you are trying to say.  I've checked my college
> introductory botany book and I checked Katherine Esau's Plant Anatomy, which
> is probably the classic book on plant anatomy, and I don't see any reference
> indicating that monocots don't have cotylodens or that the structure that
> emerges above ground when a seed germinates is considered a true leaf.  It
> is always refered to as a cotyledon.  Cotyledon is just a name botanists
> give to the leaf like structure that forms as part of the embryo, also
> sometimes refered to as seed-leaf.  If you want to consider it a true leaf
> then you also have to consider the first two leaves of the dicots to also be
> true leaves.
>
> Would you please post the references that show that monocots don't have
> cotyledons.
>
> Joe Halinar
>
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  • References:
    • Re: cotyl
      • From: "Joseph C. Halinar" <halinar@open.org>



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