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Re: New Nematode Control


In a message dated 04/10/98 17:05:55 GMT, Shelia wrote:

<< Hi, Glen.  No, my question was about nematodes in general, not foliar
 nematodes.  I understand there are soil-dwelling types that sometimes
 attack hostas.  Also, you mention pathogenic nematodes; but I was asking
 about a fungus and a mold being used as nematode controls.  I have heard
 that pathogenic nematodes are not really nematodes; so is the fungus or
 mold what you are buying when you buy "predatory nematodes"?  If so, it
 would answer another question for me - how one can add water to a dried-out
 nematode and bring it back to life!
  >>

 Shelia & all,

After a little reasearch, I haven't found any info on a biological control for
any kind of nematode, this doesn't mean there isn't one for root nematodes.
This afternoon I phoned  Chase Organics, they are one of the firms here who
supply predatory mites, pathogenic nematodes and bacteria for use as a
biological control against various pests,  their catalogue is on its way to
me. (Shelia, if it contains any useful info, I will post it on to you).

You said: 
I have heard that pathogenic nematodes are not really nematodes; so is the
fungus or mold what you are buying when you buy "predatory nematodes"?
*******
No,  there are actual - real living - pathogenic nematodes and there are also
certain types of Bacterium available.

You said:
If so, it would answer another question for me - how one can add water to a
dried-out
nematode and bring it back to life!
*******
Here, the Pathogenic nematodes used against slugs are sent out in a clay
compound. These microscopic organisms are quite able to survive in this
material, when kept within a certain temperature, so you wouldn't be bringing
anything back to life, just mixing the compound with water to then water onto
your beds.

I have not used any of these biological controls, guess I don't want to spend
money on something I can't see with my own eyes.

Glen Pether UK





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