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RE: Bloom Time Shift


Jim,

Thanks for the informative response. I think an experiment is in order
for me next spring. I have a H. sieboldiana 'Elegans' and a H. 'Tokadama
Flavocircinalis' that I will cut off the bloom scapes as soon as they
emerge. I will report back in the fall the dates that each bloom scape
emerged and was cut off for each division, the number of bloom scapes
per division that I was able to encourage to grow, and the date that the
last bloom scape began to emerge. Can anyone think of any other
pertinant information to gather?

Thanks!

Norm Lesch
Manchester, MD



>----------
>From: 	Jim Hawes[SMTP:hawesj@gcnet.net]
>Sent: 	Wednesday, October 14, 1998 4:47 PM
>To: 	hosta-open@mallorn.com
>Cc: 	hawesj@gcnet.net
>Subject: 	Re:Bloom Time Shift
>
>Norm, 
>
>You asked several difficult questions about how one can delay flowering
>of early cultivars such as sieboldianas so that they will correspond to
>dates of flowering of the late fragrant cultivars or species. I have
>never attempted this but I think I understand the various methods one
>can use and the reasons why. 

--snip--

>With that brief summary, lets go to your questions, Norm.
>
>1.At what point should you cut off the bloom scapes? 
>I SUGGEST WHEN IT FIRST EMERGES. 
>
>2. How many times can you do this before the plant gives up?
>AS LONG AS IT HAS LEAVES, IT NEVER "GIVES UP", ANTHROPOMORPHOLOGICALLY
>SPEAKING<G>.
>
>3.How late can you expect to have blooms given this method?
>PROBABLY UP TO FIRST FROST OR FREEZE DATE
>
>4. What chemical does blooming produce that causes the plant not to send
>up another bloom scape?
>AS EXPLAINED PREVIOUSLY, ONE GROWING DIVISION PRODUCES ONLY ONE SCAPE.
>THEN THE DIVISION MAY OR MAY NOT BRANCH. EACH BRANCH HAS THE POTENTIAL
>TO BLOOM.THE HORMONE INVOLVED IN CONTROLLING APICAL DOMINANCE IS AUXIN,
>PRODUCED IN THE ACTIVELY GROWING CELLS, ALSO KNOWN AS INDOLEACETIC
>ACID.  
>
>I realize this sounds very complicated...that's because it is. My
>discussion is a very simplistic one but I am sure you get the gist of
>the processes involved.
>
>Jim Hawes  Oakland MD
>hawesj@gcnet.net
>
>
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