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Re: Cutting back Hollyhocks


Hi Kay:

Sorry for the delay in answering. I was away in Montana and Colorado for 10
days.

My feeling is that the new growth is the next years plant so I do not cut it.
Do not seem to have much bug damage to the "on the ground foliage". The tops
can be massacered in the summer with the Japanese beetles and their friends. I
would be afraid to cut all the new foliage. Have had them for years. They just
popped up. The nice single ones which I like better than the doubles.  You
could cut a few and see what happens. Don't think I have been much help except
to say I wouldn't cut them.

Barbara
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