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Re: Shredded Rubber and Shredded "Pallet" Mulches


In a message dated 9/21/98 2:03:37 AM Eastern Daylight Time, enabling@TIR.COM
writes:

<< The best is pine straw.   Exactly what is pine straw?  I've never seen this
 in Michigan. >>

Pine Straw has one very dangerous concern associated with it...when its dry
and comes in contact with an ignition source (i.e.,- discarded cigarette,
etc.) it becomes almost explosive!!

It is very popular in many areas and relatively inexpensive and does
everything one would hope for in a mulch...but please don't use it around
building foundations.  The results are often horrific.  It is nothing more
than course long needled pine leaves.  The needles are loaded with Pine pitch,
which is basically turpentine and highly flammable.  It burns almost at an
explosive rate.  Newer zoning restrictions, especially in the Carolinas,
prohibit its use for this very reason.

I personally feel you can't beat the LARGE size pine bark chunks (Especially
Redwood or Cedar) which lasts for years.  The large chunks don't break down
readily.  They are expensive initially to put down at the required 3" deep
rate, but they last for years.  Of course the slugs love them, but what don't
they like and you need to use some kind of edging to keep the bark chunks from
escaping out into the lawn but I feel it's the best.  I use an extra thick
black plastic under it to manage the weeds or a pre-emergent herbicide since
weeds can be a concern with all mulches.

Of course the best part is that its all organic, natural and aesthetically
pleasing.

SO...PLEASE DON'T USE PINE STRAW AROUND FOUNDATIONS...IT'S OUTRIGHT DANGEROUS
AND I DON'T WANT TO BE THE ONE TO SAY...I TOLD YOU SO!

Best wishes,
Dave  
UNYHS President
Albany, NY Area where it's going down to 38 degrees tomorrow night!!
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