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[IGSROBIN] Question on soil


Hello Judith,

You raised a good soil-question.
My experiments with planting seedlings in 9cm pots, instead of planting
first in 5 cm and then in 9 cm results in the following conclusion (at
this time):
Small plants in a rather large pot feel happy if the composition of the
soil fits with their needs, which a not to rich, well drained soil. I
make this mix of compost, sand and gravel without any fertilizer.
Water the plant only direct around the little plant and keep the rest of
the soil in the pot dry. So the water not needed for the plant has space
to go.
When the plant starts growing, add a bit of fertilizer, prefairably
organic.
Herewith we imitate what is happening with spontaneous seedlings in the
garden. What we see are the lucky ones, all seedlings on bad spots have
disappeared allready and what we see are only the happy seeds, fallen in
the good places and that's may be 1 on a 100.
A small healthy plant as you mentioned Judith, will be planted in the
garden on a good place and has the same chance as that one lucky seed.

I think that if you plant a seedling direct in a large pot, it is better
then to re-pot and disturbe it. From an economical point of view do
small pots require less space, but for an amateur that's no point.

Hope you can do something with this.
Best wishes,

Rein ten Klooster (Holland)





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