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Re: Capillary Matting

  • Subject: Re: [IGSROBIN] Capillary Matting
  • From: Claire Peplowski <ECPep@AOL.COM>
  • Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2002 21:47:18 EDT

In a message dated 6/11/02 8:20:47 PM Eastern Daylight Time, katrina@ICDC.COM

<< Claire, your PVC pipe system sounds great. May I ask what lengths you
 use--you say any width and that makes sense, but there must be a length that
 works best.  Thanks.

 Katrina >>

I don't think the length is too important.  My son owns an HVAC business and
I started by picking up scrap of all sizes.  Finally they cut some for me so
the boxes would be uniform.  I think you would want about twice the length of
the cutting that will be under the sand for root formation.  For example a
small wooden box full of pelargonium cuttings outside  that was done this
weekend have pipe pieces about 10 inches (about 25 cm.).  You can vary the
width by what you have or can find.  A point I did not make is that a whole
lot of cuttings can be done this way each with a very good root system not
disturbed by any kind of divison and taking very little space.

For someone else who mentioned watering problems in pots, I have managed to
keep that a bit controlled by covering the seed with grit.  The seeds do not
float around and the grit stays dry.

Claire Peplowski
NYS z4

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